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Glass-Shattering! How Wineglass Size Has Changed Since 1700

Added: 14.12.2017 11:05 | 0 views | 0 comments

This holiday season, will you view the glass as half full or half empty? Well, that might depend on the size of the glass.

Tags: Wine
From: www.livescience.com

As California's Wine Country Continues To Recover From The Fires, Tourism Still Lags

Added: 14.12.2017 10:08 | 0 views | 0 comments

California's wine country has recovered well from the devastating fires of this past autumn. Tourism, however, still lags.

From: www.forbes.com

Mistletoe and (a large) wine: Seven-fold increase in wine glass size over 300 years

Added: 13.12.2017 22:01 | 0 views | 0 comments

Our Georgian and Victorian ancestors probably celebrated Christmas with more modest wine consumption than we do today -- if the size of their wine glasses are anything to go by. Researchers have found that the capacity of wine glasses has increased seven-fold over the past 300 years, and most steeply in the last two decades as wine consumption rose.

Tags: Georgia, Wine, Cher
From: www.sciencedaily.com

The real reason why a flat white costs more than other coffee

Added: 13.12.2017 21:29 | 0 views | 0 comments


The epitome of coffee cool, the flat white came under fire this week as Conal Lavery of Thomson’s Coffee Roasters told Channel 4’s Supershoppers that customers were being ripped off by excessive pricing. In Starbucks, you can expect to pay £2.40 for a tall latte (12 fl oz) with two shots of coffee, but £2.60 for a significantly smaller flat white (8 fl oz). In Caffè Nero, a medium latte is £2.50 - but a flat white will set you back £2.60.  Based on their ingredients, he explained, a flat white (a double espresso shot with a single portion of textured milk) should be cheaper. "There is no reason for a flat white to cost any more," he said.  "The chains and the speciality independent side of the market do a double shot as standard [in flat whites as well as lattes]," he added. "So you are getting the same amount of coffee and with a flat white but with less milk. So if anything, it should cost less." I hate the word hipster, but people are buying into the East London thing Previously the preserve of specialists and coffee drinkers in Australia and New Zealand, where it originated, the flat white entered public consciousness a couple of years ago. It's now a mainstream choice on the high street - but still comes at a seemingly bizarre premium.  So, are hapless consumers being tricked into thinking we're buying a superior coffee? Or are we paying some sort of zeitgeist tax? What does the flat white represent to you? Credit: Getty The inflated price might have something to do with the fact that the espresso-based coffee is still synonymous with the "cool" East London lifestyle, says Chloe Callow, coffee expert and editor of Caffeine Magazine.  Callow agrees that the flat white costs no more to produce than other conventional coffees - but she does say that there's an added skill in texturing the milk. A proper flat white should be made using whole milk that is steamed to microfoam consistency - this means aerating the milk less than if you were making a latte, which creates a silkier texture. There's also an art to producing the detailed and highly Instagrammable foam art that is synonymous with a flat white. If done properly, all of this requires investment in a skilled barista. Coffee decoded: why filter is the only way to brew beans now However, Callow suggests that the other reason for the higher cost of a flat white comes from its "perceived value". Retailers are relying on the desire of consumers to be part of a trend. "These customers are not just buying a flat white, she says. "They’re buying into a lifestyle." For Callow, the flat white represents an accessible, affordable, bite-sized portion of cool - which grants momentary inclusion into a certain tribe.  "The [flat white] trend stemmed from the rise of independent coffee shops in London - think of the stereotype of the tattooed barista." Is your flat white really worth the extra pennies? "There are loads of them now, but when they first arrived, they were pioneers of this 'third wave' coffee scene. The flat white was less accessible back then, and seen as something a little bit different." Third Wave coffee, for those of you who didn't get the memo, is the term for the global movement towards treating coffee as an artisan food product. "The flat white is a small luxury but it's still affordable - it's perceived as niche, and above and beyond the everyday," continues Callow. "It's not like buying a cup of tea and a biscuit. I hate the word 'hipster', but people are buying into the East London thing, and taking a moment to feel like they're part of a different demographic. Full of beans: Britain's 30 best and buzziest coffee shops The mystery that still surrounds coffee, she suggests, also contributes to the allure of slightly less orthodox brews. "Because coffee isn't well understood by many, it's still seen as mysterious - even by chefs in restaurants. It's exotic and unknown, a bit like natural wine." But the question is, does Callow think the flat white is a rip-off? Apparently not. "For £3, it's worth it - and most people don't mind, because of what it represents." Whatever the flat white represents to you, it seems that the jury is out.  

Is size important when it comes to wine glasses?

Added: 13.12.2017 20:54 | 1 views | 0 comments

If your wine was served in a smaller glass, would you drink less of it?

Tags: Wine
From: www.bbc.co.uk

The real reason why a flat white costs more than other coffee

Added: 13.12.2017 19:09 | 0 views | 0 comments


The epitome of coffee cool, the flat white came under fire this week as Conal Lavery of Thomson’s Coffee Roasters told Channel 4’s Supershoppers that customers were being ripped off by excessive pricing. In Starbucks, you can expect to pay £2.40 for a tall latte (12 fl oz) with two shots of coffee, but £2.60 for a significantly smaller flat white (8 fl oz). In Caffè Nero, a medium latte is £2.50 - but a flat white will set you back £2.60.  Based on their ingredients, he explained, a flat white (a double espresso shot with a single portion of textured milk) should be cheaper. "There is no reason for a flat white to cost any more," he said.  "The chains and the speciality independent side of the market do a double shot as standard [in flat whites as well as lattes]," he added. "So you are getting the same amount of coffee and with a flat white but with less milk. So if anything, it should cost less." I hate the word hipster, but people are buying into the East London thing Previously the preserve of specialists and coffee drinkers in Australia and New Zealand, where it originated, the flat white entered public consciousness a couple of years ago. It's now a mainstream choice on the high street - but still comes at a seemingly bizarre premium.  So, are hapless consumers being tricked into thinking we're buying a superior coffee? Or are we paying some sort of zeitgeist tax? What does the flat white represent to you? Credit: Getty The inflated price might have something to do with the fact that the espresso-based coffee is still synonymous with the "cool" East London lifestyle, says Chloe Callow, coffee expert and editor of Caffeine Magazine.  Callow agrees that the flat white costs no more to produce than other conventional coffees - but she does say that there's an added skill in texturing the milk. A proper flat white should be made using whole milk that is steamed to microfoam consistency - this means aerating the milk less than if you were making a latte, which creates a silkier texture. There's also an art to producing the detailed and highly Instagrammable foam art that is synonymous with a flat white. If done properly, all of this requires investment in a skilled barista. Coffee decoded: why filter is the only way to brew beans now However, Callow suggests that the other reason for the higher cost of a flat white comes from its "perceived value". Retailers are relying on the desire of consumers to be part of a trend. "These customers are not just buying a flat white, she says. "They’re buying into a lifestyle." For Callow, the flat white represents an accessible, affordable, bite-sized portion of cool - which grants momentary inclusion into a certain tribe.  "The [flat white] trend stemmed from the rise of independent coffee shops in London - think of the stereotype of the tattooed barista." Is your flat white really worth the extra pennies? "There are loads of them now, but when they first arrived, they were pioneers of this 'third wave' coffee scene. The flat white was less accessible back then, and seen as something a little bit different." Third Wave coffee, for those of you who didn't get the memo, is the term for the global movement towards treating coffee as an artisan food product. "The flat white is a small luxury but it's still affordable - it's perceived as niche, and above and beyond the everyday," continues Callow. "It's not like buying a cup of tea and a biscuit. I hate the word 'hipster', but people are buying into the East London thing, and taking a moment to feel like they're part of a different demographic. Full of beans: Britain's 30 best and buzziest coffee shops The mystery that still surrounds coffee, she suggests, also contributes to the allure of slightly less orthodox brews. "Because coffee isn't well understood by many, it's still seen as mysterious - even by chefs in restaurants. It's exotic and unknown, a bit like natural wine." But the question is, does Callow think the flat white is a rip-off? Apparently not. "For £3, it's worth it - and most people don't mind, because of what it represents." Whatever the flat white represents to you, it seems that the jury is out.  

Turtles trapped in plastic forced to drag lethal cargo through seas until they die, study finds

Added: 13.12.2017 18:24 | 0 views | 0 comments


Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans while others are forced to live attached to debris bigger than their own bodies, a new study has found. A world-wide survey of 106 marine experts by the University of Exeter found that 91 per cent of the entangled turtles are found dead with many having suffered serious wounds which have amputated limbs or chocked them to death. Others that survived are forced to drag huge mounds of disgarded rubbish or debris with them until they die, experts said.  The throwaway plastic we use for just minutes can turn into a floating trap for marine creatures that lurks in our oceans for centuries.Greenpeace UK's head of oceans Will McCallum The survey found that more than 1,000 turtles each year are being killed after becoming tangled up in lost fishing nets,  plastic twine and nylon fishing line, as well as six pack rings from canned drinks, plastic packaging straps, plastic balloon string, kite string, plastic packaging and discarded anchor line and seismic cable.  Turtles were also discovered entangled in discarded plastic chairs, wooden crates, weather balloons and boat mooring line. Leatherback turtle entangled in fishing ropes which increases drag Credit: Kate Charles  Professor Brendan Godley. Professor of Conservation Science and Director of the Centre for Ecology & Conservation at the University of Exeter’s Penryn campus and the lead author warned that as plastic pollution increases more and more turtles are likely to become entangled. “Plastic rubbish in the oceans, including lost or disgarded fishing gear which is not biodegradable, is a major threat to marine turtles," he said. "We found, based on beach strandings, that more than 1000 turtles are dying a year after becoming tangled up, but this is almost certainly a gross underestimate. Young turtles and hatchings are particularly vulnerable to entanglement. "Experts we surveyed found that entanglement in plastic and other pollution could pose a long term impact on the survival of some turtle populations and is a greater threat to them than oil spills.  "We need to cut the level of plastic waste and purse biodegradable alternatives if we are to tackle this grave threat to turtles’ welfare.”  Hawksbill turtle entangled in fishing material constricting shell growth, Kaeyama Island, Japan Prof Godley urged beach-goers walking over Christmas to collect plastic debris before it is washed back out to sea. "It is something that can make a concrete difference, if everyone out on their Christmas walk picked up the rubbish they find on the beach." The Exeter University research team, which included two research students Emily Duncan and Zara Botterell who work in conjunction with Plymouth Marine Laboratory, surveyed experts who rescue and rehabilitate stranded turtles in 43 countries, to find out if they had discovered turtles which had been tangled up. Drowned Green turtle entangled in ghost nets in Uruguay  They also found 23 reports of entangled turtles in peer-reviewed publications, magazines, newspapers and reports. 84 per cent of the 106 experts surveyed, said they had found turtles tangled in rubbish, in the Atlantic, Pacific Caribbean, Mediterranean and Indian ocean coast. Although they found more than 1,000 entangled turtles, they believe the real number is far higher because many animals will decay at sea. Greenpeace UK's head of oceans Will McCallum said: "Nearly all species of turtle are endangered and yet research like this shows that the threats from human activity are only getting worse. "The throwaway plastic we use for just minutes can turn into a floating trap for marine creatures like whales and turtles that lurks in our oceans for centuries. "If UK ministers are truly feeling inspired after watching Blue Planet II, then a good place to start would be stopping plastics getting into the ocean by pushing ahead with plans for a deposit return scheme." The research was published in the journal Endangered Species Research.

The real reason why a flat white costs more than other coffee

Added: 13.12.2017 18:09 | 0 views | 0 comments


The epitome of coffee cool, the flat white came under fire this week as Conal Lavery of Thomson’s Coffee Roasters told Channel 4’s Supershoppers that customers were being ripped off by excessive pricing. In Starbucks, you can expect to pay £2.40 for a tall latte (12 fl oz) with two shots of coffee, but £2.60 for a significantly smaller flat white (8 fl oz). In Caffè Nero, a medium latte is £2.50 - but a flat white will set you back £2.60.  Based on their ingredients, he explained, a flat white (a double espresso shot with a single portion of textured milk) should be cheaper. "There is no reason for a flat white to cost any more," he said.  "The chains and the speciality independent side of the market do a double shot as standard [in flat whites as well as lattes]," he added. "So you are getting the same amount of coffee and with a flat white but with less milk. So if anything, it should cost less." I hate the word hipster, but people are buying into the East London thing Previously the preserve of specialists and coffee drinkers in Australia and New Zealand, where it originated, the flat white entered public consciousness a couple of years ago. It's now a mainstream choice on the high street - but still comes at a seemingly bizarre premium.  So, are hapless consumers being tricked into thinking we're buying a superior coffee? Or are we paying some sort of zeitgeist tax? What does the flat white represent to you? Credit: Getty The inflated price might have something to do with the fact that the espresso-based coffee is still synonymous with the "cool" East London lifestyle, says Chloe Callow, coffee expert and editor of Caffeine Magazine.  Callow agrees that the flat white costs no more to produce than other conventional coffees - but she does say that there's an added skill in texturing the milk. A proper flat white should be made using whole milk that is steamed to microfoam consistency - this means aerating the milk less than if you were making a latte, which creates a silkier texture. There's also an art to producing the detailed and highly Instagrammable foam art that is synonymous with a flat white. If done properly, all of this requires investment in a skilled barista. Coffee decoded: why filter is the only way to brew beans now However, Callow suggests that the other reason for the higher cost of a flat white comes from its "perceived value". Retailers are relying on the desire of consumers to be part of a trend. "These customers are not just buying a flat white, she says. "They’re buying into a lifestyle." For Callow, the flat white represents an accessible, affordable, bite-sized portion of cool - which grants momentary inclusion into a certain tribe.  "The [flat white] trend stemmed from the rise of independent coffee shops in London - think of the stereotype of the tattooed barista." Is your flat white really worth the extra pennies? "There are loads of them now, but when they first arrived, they were pioneers of this 'third wave' coffee scene. The flat white was less accessible back then, and seen as something a little bit different." Third Wave coffee, for those of you who didn't get the memo, is the term for the global movement towards treating coffee as an artisan food product. "The flat white is a small luxury but it's still affordable - it's perceived as niche, and above and beyond the everyday," continues Callow. "It's not like buying a cup of tea and a biscuit. I hate the word 'hipster', but people are buying into the East London thing, and taking a moment to feel like they're part of a different demographic. Full of beans: Britain's 30 best and buzziest coffee shops The mystery that still surrounds coffee, she suggests, also contributes to the allure of slightly less orthodox brews. "Because coffee isn't well understood by many, it's still seen as mysterious - even by chefs in restaurants. It's exotic and unknown, a bit like natural wine." But the question is, does Callow think the flat white is a rip-off? Apparently not. "For £3, it's worth it - and most people don't mind, because of what it represents." Whatever the flat white represents to you, it seems that the jury is out.  

Turtles trapped in plastic forced to drag lethal cargo through seas until they die, study finds

Added: 13.12.2017 17:29 | 0 views | 0 comments


Hundreds of marine turtles die every year after becoming entangled in rubbish in the oceans while others are forced to live attached to debris bigger than their own bodies, a new study has found. A world-wide survey of 106 marine experts by the University of Exeter found that 91 per cent of the entangled turtles are found dead with many having suffered serious wounds which have amputated limbs or chocked them to death. Others that survived are forced to drag huge mounds of disgarded rubbish or debris with them until they die, experts said.  The throwaway plastic we use for just minutes can turn into a floating trap for marine creatures that lurks in our oceans for centuries.Greenpeace UK's head of oceans Will McCallum The survey found that more than 1,000 turtles each year are being killed after becoming tangled up in lost fishing nets,  plastic twine and nylon fishing line, as well as six pack rings from canned drinks, plastic packaging straps, plastic balloon string, kite string, plastic packaging and discarded anchor line and seismic cable.  Turtles were also discovered entangled in discarded plastic chairs, wooden crates, weather balloons and boat mooring line. Leatherback turtle entangled in fishing ropes which increases drag Credit: Kate Charles  Professor Brendan Godley. Professor of Conservation Science and Director of the Centre for Ecology & Conservation at the University of Exeter’s Penryn campus and the lead author warned that as plastic pollution increases more and more turtles are likely to become entangled. “Plastic rubbish in the oceans, including lost or disgarded fishing gear which is not biodegradable, is a major threat to marine turtles," he said. "We found, based on beach strandings, that more than 1000 turtles are dying a year after becoming tangled up, but this is almost certainly a gross underestimate. Young turtles and hatchings are particularly vulnerable to entanglement. "Experts we surveyed found that entanglement in plastic and other pollution could pose a long term impact on the survival of some turtle populations and is a greater threat to them than oil spills.  "We need to cut the level of plastic waste and purse biodegradable alternatives if we are to tackle this grave threat to turtles’ welfare.”  Hawksbill turtle entangled in fishing material constricting shell growth, Kaeyama Island, Japan Prof Godley urged beach-goers walking over Christmas to collect plastic debris before it is washed back out to sea. "It is something that can make a concrete difference, if everyone out on their Christmas walk picked up the rubbish they find on the beach." The Exeter University research team, which included two research students Emily Duncan and Zara Botterell who work in conjunction with Plymouth Marine Laboratory, surveyed experts who rescue and rehabilitate stranded turtles in 43 countries, to find out if they had discovered turtles which had been tangled up. Drowned Green turtle entangled in ghost nets in Uruguay  They also found 23 reports of entangled turtles in peer-reviewed publications, magazines, newspapers and reports. 84 per cent of the 106 experts surveyed, said they had found turtles tangled in rubbish, in the Atlantic, Pacific Caribbean, Mediterranean and Indian ocean coast. Although they found more than 1,000 entangled turtles, they believe the real number is far higher because many animals will decay at sea. Greenpeace UK's head of oceans Will McCallum said: "Nearly all species of turtle are endangered and yet research like this shows that the threats from human activity are only getting worse. "The throwaway plastic we use for just minutes can turn into a floating trap for marine creatures like whales and turtles that lurks in our oceans for centuries. "If UK ministers are truly feeling inspired after watching Blue Planet II, then a good place to start would be stopping plastics getting into the ocean by pushing ahead with plans for a deposit return scheme." The research was published in the journal Endangered Species Research.

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