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National Rifle Association facing backlash as corporate giants drop links with gun lobby group

Added: 24.02.2018 7:27 | 0 views | 0 comments


A wave of companies has ended their association with the National Rifle Association as the backlash against the gun lobby group spreads. In the wake of the Parkland shooting, companies have come under pressure on social media to sever their ties with the NRA. The NRA's five million members have, until now, enjoyed a raft of favourable deals from the NRA's corporate partners, including cut-price car hire. However Hertz and Enterprise holdings - the parent company of major car rental firms Enterprise, Alamo and National - announced the end of their co-branding memberships. First National Bank of Omaha, which offers the "Official Credit Card of the NRA" - with benefits including  five per cent cash back on petrol and sporting goods - announced it was ending the arrangement. Read more | Florida school shooting Symantec, which offered anti-virus software, has stopped offering NRA members a discount which slashed the price of its top package from $110 to $48. Chubb Insurance has confirmed it will no longer underwrite "NRA Carry Guard" policies, although the company took the decision three months ago. The sweeping corporate desertion of the NRA follows a social media campaign under the #BoycottNRA hashtag, which has named and shamed companies with ties to the gun lobby group. The following companies have cut ties with the NRA over the last 24 hours. - Enterprise - Wyndham - Metlife - Hertz - Best Western - First National Bank - Alamo - National - Symantec - Chubb - SIRVA #BoycottNRA The list is growing!! RETWEET to show support!!— Brian Krassenstein�� (@krassenstein) February 23, 2018 Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, which was founded after the 2012 shootings in Sandy Hook, has sent letters to streaming television companies demanding they axe NRA TV from their line-ups. Such is the groundswell of anger that a number of companies which severed their links with the NRA some time ago have publicly disowned the organisation on social media. In the past the NRA has not been averse to orchestrating a boycott campaign of its own, notably in 2000, when it targeted Smith & Wesson, which had cut a deal with the Clinton administration. The gun manufacturers were accused of "caving in" after agreeing a package of measures including restrictions on sales, the introduction of locking devices and limits on clip sizes. Gun owners deserted Smith & Wesson, which suffered a 40 per cent slump in gun sales.

From: www.yahoo.com

'How dare you': CNN's Camerota clashes with NRA's Loesch over her claim that media 'love' mass shootings

Added: 24.02.2018 3:25 | 0 views | 0 comments


The national spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association on Friday doubled down on her claim that members of the media “love” mass shootings, like last week’s school massacre in Parkland, Fla., because of the bump in television ratings that some networks experience.

From: www.yahoo.com

Nanette Fabray, star of stage, screen and TV, dies at 97

Added: 24.02.2018 0:25 | 0 views | 0 comments

Nanette Fabray, the actress, singer and dancer who became a star in Broadway musicals, on television and in hit movies such as "The Band Wagon," has died at 97.

From: www.nbcnews.com

The standout moments that made CNN's gun control town hall feel like a game-changer

Added: 23.02.2018 23:32 | 0 views | 0 comments


On Wednesday night, a raw, emotional town hall about gun control on CNN emerged as a pivotal moment in the debate over gun control.  As a crowd of several thousand cheered and jeered, the survivors and families of the victims of last week's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, pushed back on Senator Marco Rubio and NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch more than any member of the media has.  SEE ALSO: Amy Poehler blasts NRA after they tweeted a 'Parks & Rec' GIF This movement is being led by a group of brave and mature-beyond-their-years teenagers who are unafraid to express their fury at an inactive government and the big money that enables them. And it finally feels like this time, finally, something is different.  That it was all broadcast on a national platform like CNN was even more crucial, and it provided a stark contrast to the usual empty talking points that are circulated by six-pundit panels on cable news. While such town halls are often devoid of substance, the students and their tenacity not only broke the cycle of these pointless made-for-TV debates, but also changed the conversation in the process. Students like Emma Gonzalez and Cameron Kasky have given voice to the anger and grief we've collectively felt too many times. They've channeled their outrage and exasperation in a way that, though sometimes uncomfortable, refused to let apathy sink in, cracking the shiny facade of cable news and pushing the gun debate forward. Emma Gonzalez, Sheriff Israel refuse to let Dana Loesch off the hook Emma Gonzalez has already gained notice for her passionate speech in the wake of the shooting, and on Wednesday night she was one of many students bravely stood their ground against those in power — including NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch.  Loesch has caused controversy in the past with her pro-gun statements for the NRA, but that didn't rattle Gonzalez, who not only didn't blink in the face of one of America's most (in)famous gun advocates, but wouldn't let Loesch get away with ducking the question, proving herself to be a tougher questioner than so many reporters have in the past.  And Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel followed up on Gonzalez's questioning, refusing to let Loesch off easy for her stance, telling her, "You're not standing up for [the students] until you say 'I want less weapons.'" The one-two combo of a student survivor and a respected law enforcement official — whose jurisdiction includes the school where the shooting occurred — was an undeniable show of unity against an organization that has sunk countless millions into making sure guns like the one used in this (and other) mass shootings remain obtainable.  Cameron Kasky and Fred Guttenberg corner Senator Marco Rubio When given the chance to directly confront an elected official that is supposed to represent the people, it's reasonable to think that the heat of your argument might dim a little because of the weight of the moment.  But not in the case of Cameron Kasky. Another student survivor of the shooting, Kasky called Rubio out on his acceptance of NRA campaign contributions and challenged him to start turning them down as cheers from attendees rained down.  The debate around the NRA's lobbying efforts is another milestone in the familiar cycle of mass shootings. Those lawmakers that accept the NRA's money are called out, time and again. Yet few of them have had to face down survivors of a mass shooting like Rubio did on Wednesday night in front of a national television audience.  SEE ALSO: Powerful New York Times ad calls out lawmakers funded by the NRA Kasky wasn't the only one who pressed Rubio hard. Fred Guttenberg, whose daughter Jaime was killed in the shooting, told Rubio point blank that statements made by him and by President Trump in the wake of the shooting were "pathetically weak."  Rubio was forced to look into the eyes of a parent who'd lost his child and address his views. The in-person audience hurled boos at Rubio while an anguished parent lambasted him in a way he's not used to. It was raw and riveting and beyond any television CNN or its competitors have produced in a long time. It was also probably the toughest questioning Rubio has ever faced — on CNN or any other news channel. And that it came from a high school student and a grieving parent shouldn't be lost on us. A new bar for holding politicians accountable has been set. Sheriff Israel takes the lead While the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have been at the forefront of the renewed debate, they have a powerful ally in the aforementioned Sheriff Scott Israel. That a leading law enforcement member has so vocally backed the students only gives legitimacy to their point of view. To say that law enforcement has become a lightning rod in our current divisive political environment is a brutal understatement.  But Sheriff Israel has been an ardent supporter of the students' initiatives since the shooting. Doing so on a national stage, standing with the students in front of a national audience and leaving no wiggle room for those looking to twist his words, was a powerful show of unity to a nation that badly needs it.  The students refuse to go quietly Perhaps the most cathartic moment came at the conclusion of the town hall, when students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School sang "Shine," an original song written by the students about love and defiance in the face of tragedy. While the song features moving lyrics, especially considering the context in which the students wrote it — "We're not gonna let you win / We're putting up a fight / You may have brought the dark / But together we will shine a light" — it was the spoken interludes from the students that delivered the biggest punch.  When one student emotionally delivered the line, "We refuse to be ignored by those who refuse to listen," it was easy to believe her. The fiery resolve was evident to anyone watching the town hall and listening to the song.  SEE ALSO: Parkland shooting survivors call for a march on Washington, D.C. So often these events are dominated by politicians who excel at spinning direct questions in banal talking points and by "commentators" who sometimes mean well but ultimately spout the same sound bites over and over, a circle of "analysis" that sounds all too familiar. But the students and their allies — law enforcement, teachers, the parents of their slain classmates — made the most of the platform they were given Wednesday night, transforming the typically made-for-TV event into something rawer, more emotional and, ultimately, more powerful than anyone could have possibly imagined. 

Stephen King’s The Bone Church Is Potentially Headed to a TV Near You (The TV Is Also Bones)

Added: 23.02.2018 21:44 | 0 views | 0 comments

We as a society are dead-set on wringing every last word from author Stephen King, like he’s a horror-writing orange with a fun Twitter presence, for use in TV or film. To whit, Deadline reports that King’s The Bone Church has been acquired for development as a television series. First ...

From: feedproxy.google.com

'How dare you': CNN's Camerota clashes with NRA's Loesch over her claim that media 'love' mass shootings

Added: 23.02.2018 20:19 | 0 views | 0 comments


The national spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association on Friday doubled down on her claim that members of the media “love” mass shootings, like last week’s school massacre in Parkland, Fla., because of the bump in television ratings that some networks experience.

From: www.yahoo.com

Palestinian President Abbas confirms medical checks, says results 'positive'

Added: 23.02.2018 19:44 | 0 views | 0 comments

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas confirmed on Thursday that he went into hospital in the United States for medical checks, saying in a television interview that the results were "positive." Abbas, 82, flew to the United States to address the U.N. Security Council in New York on Feb. 20. Abbas confirmed this on Thursday, after the tests.

From: www.yahoo.com

Couple pleads guilty to illegally pocketing prison TV fees

Added: 23.02.2018 16:57 | 0 views | 0 comments

Authorities say a western New York couple who sold satellite television contracts to state prisons illegally pocketed $375,000 that should have gone to DirecTV.

From: feeds.foxbusiness.com

The standout moments that made CNN's gun control town hall feel like a game-changer

Added: 23.02.2018 13:24 | 0 views | 0 comments


On Wednesday night, a raw, emotional town hall about gun control on CNN emerged as a pivotal moment in the debate over gun control.  As a crowd of several thousand cheered and jeered, the survivors and families of the victims of last week's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, pushed back on Senator Marco Rubio and NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch more than any member of the media has.  SEE ALSO: Amy Poehler blasts NRA after they tweeted a 'Parks & Rec' GIF This movement is being led by a group of brave and mature-beyond-their-years teenagers who are unafraid to express their fury at an inactive government and the big money that enables them. And it finally feels like this time, finally, something is different.  That it was all broadcast on a national platform like CNN was even more crucial, and it provided a stark contrast to the usual empty talking points that are circulated by six-pundit panels on cable news. While such town halls are often devoid of substance, the students and their tenacity not only broke the cycle of these pointless made-for-TV debates, but also changed the conversation in the process. Students like Emma Gonzalez and Cameron Kasky have given voice to the anger and grief we've collectively felt too many times. They've channeled their outrage and exasperation in a way that, though sometimes uncomfortable, refused to let apathy sink in, cracking the shiny facade of cable news and pushing the gun debate forward. Emma Gonzalez, Sheriff Israel refuse to let Dana Loesch off the hook Emma Gonzalez has already gained notice for her passionate speech in the wake of the shooting, and on Wednesday night she was one of many students bravely stood their ground against those in power — including NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch.  Loesch has caused controversy in the past with her pro-gun statements for the NRA, but that didn't rattle Gonzalez, who not only didn't blink in the face of one of America's most (in)famous gun advocates, but wouldn't let Loesch get away with ducking the question, proving herself to be a tougher questioner than so many reporters have in the past.  And Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel followed up on Gonzalez's questioning, refusing to let Loesch off easy for her stance, telling her, "You're not standing up for [the students] until you say 'I want less weapons.'" The one-two combo of a student survivor and a respected law enforcement official — whose jurisdiction includes the school where the shooting occurred — was an undeniable show of unity against an organization that has sunk countless millions into making sure guns like the one used in this (and other) mass shootings remain obtainable.  Cameron Kasky and Fred Guttenberg corner Senator Marco Rubio When given the chance to directly confront an elected official that is supposed to represent the people, it's reasonable to think that the heat of your argument might dim a little because of the weight of the moment.  But not in the case of Cameron Kasky. Another student survivor of the shooting, Kasky called Rubio out on his acceptance of NRA campaign contributions and challenged him to start turning them down as cheers from attendees rained down.  The debate around the NRA's lobbying efforts is another milestone in the familiar cycle of mass shootings. Those lawmakers that accept the NRA's money are called out, time and again. Yet few of them have had to face down survivors of a mass shooting like Rubio did on Wednesday night in front of a national television audience.  SEE ALSO: Powerful New York Times ad calls out lawmakers funded by the NRA Kasky wasn't the only one who pressed Rubio hard. Fred Guttenberg, whose daughter Jaime was killed in the shooting, told Rubio point blank that statements made by him and by President Trump in the wake of the shooting were "pathetically weak."  Rubio was forced to look into the eyes of a parent who'd lost his child and address his views. The in-person audience hurled boos at Rubio while an anguished parent lambasted him in a way he's not used to. It was raw and riveting and beyond any television CNN or its competitors have produced in a long time. It was also probably the toughest questioning Rubio has ever faced — on CNN or any other news channel. And that it came from a high school student and a grieving parent shouldn't be lost on us. A new bar for holding politicians accountable has been set. Sheriff Israel takes the lead While the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have been at the forefront of the renewed debate, they have a powerful ally in the aforementioned Sheriff Scott Israel. That a leading law enforcement member has so vocally backed the students only gives legitimacy to their point of view. To say that law enforcement has become a lightning rod in our current divisive political environment is a brutal understatement.  But Sheriff Israel has been an ardent supporter of the students' initiatives since the shooting. Doing so on a national stage, standing with the students in front of a national audience and leaving no wiggle room for those looking to twist his words, was a powerful show of unity to a nation that badly needs it.  The students refuse to go quietly Perhaps the most cathartic moment came at the conclusion of the town hall, when students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School sang "Shine," an original song written by the students about love and defiance in the face of tragedy. While the song features moving lyrics, especially considering the context in which the students wrote it — "We're not gonna let you win / We're putting up a fight / You may have brought the dark / But together we will shine a light" — it was the spoken interludes from the students that delivered the biggest punch.  When one student emotionally delivered the line, "We refuse to be ignored by those who refuse to listen," it was easy to believe her. The fiery resolve was evident to anyone watching the town hall and listening to the song.  SEE ALSO: Parkland shooting survivors call for a march on Washington, D.C. So often these events are dominated by politicians who excel at spinning direct questions in banal talking points and by "commentators" who sometimes mean well but ultimately spout the same sound bites over and over, a circle of "analysis" that sounds all too familiar. But the students and their allies — law enforcement, teachers, the parents of their slain classmates — made the most of the platform they were given Wednesday night, transforming the typically made-for-TV event into something rawer, more emotional and, ultimately, more powerful than anyone could have possibly imagined. 

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