News with tag Spiders  RSS
Fastest spin on Earth? For animals that rely on legs, scientists say one spider takes gold

Added: 22.02.2018 21:40 | 0 views | 0 comments

New research shows that individuals from the spider family Selenopidae -- commonly known as flattie spiders -- can sense prey approaching from any direction and whip around in one-eighth of a second to strike. High-speed footage reveals that a swift flex of their long legs helps the hunters accomplish this feat, deemed the fastest leg-driven turn of any animal on the planet.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

What this man spotted on his home security feed while out for the night is absolutely terrifying

Added: 20.02.2018 21:29 | 1 views | 0 comments

The man was advised to sell his home after a giant "radioactive" spider was seen walking in his living room

From: www.mirror.co.uk

Take a Cu Chi Tunnels Tour in Ho Chi Minh City

Added: 18.02.2018 21:37 | 0 views | 0 comments


Considered one of the greatest tactical achievements of the southern insurgency during the American War, the Cu Chi Tunnels spiderweb beneath miles of rice paddies and fertile farmland all the way from Ho Chi Minh City to the Cambodian border.

Tags: Spiders, Ricoh
From: moon.com

World's most venomous spiders are actually cousins

Added: 15.02.2018 13:11 | 0 views | 0 comments

Two lineages of dangerous arachnids found in Australia -- long classified as distantly related in the official taxonomy -- are, in fact, relatively close evolutionary cousins. The lineages include the most venomous spiders in the world. The findings could help in the development of novel antivenoms, as well as point to new forms of insecticides.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

World's most venomous spiders are actually cousins

Added: 15.02.2018 13:11 | 0 views | 0 comments

Two lineages of dangerous arachnids found in Australia -- long classified as distantly related in the official taxonomy -- are, in fact, relatively close evolutionary cousins. The lineages include the most venomous spiders in the world. The findings could help in the development of novel antivenoms, as well as point to new forms of insecticides.

From: feeds.sciencedaily.com

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