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Pentagon strategy drops climate change as a security threat

Added: 20.01.2018 9:26 | 0 views | 0 comments


Climate change and the impact it has on national and international security was not included in the US national defense strategy, unveiled by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis on Friday. The move is perhaps not surprising given that President Donald Trump has called climate change a hoax, and last June announced that he would pull the United States out of the historic Paris climate pact unless there were changes to the US side of the deal. In 2016 President Barack Obama labeled climate change a threat to national security, and for years experts and scientists have pointed to the impacts of natural disasters, famines and rising sea levels as prompting refugee flows that threaten global stability.

Adulthood now begins at 24, say scientists as young people delay work, marriage and families 

Added: 20.01.2018 8:27 | 0 views | 0 comments


Adulthood does not begin until 24, scientists have concluded because young people are continuing their education for longer and delaying marriage and parenthood. The traditional definition for adolescence is currently between and the ages of 10 and 19, which marked the beginnings of puberty and the perceived end of biological growth. But, writing in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, scientists from the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne argue the timings needs to be changed. They point to the fact that the brain continues to mature beyond the age of 20, and many people’s wisdom teeth do not come through until the age of 25. And people are also getting married and having children later, with the average man entering their first marriage aged 32.5 and women 30.6, an increase of eight years since the 1970s. Families have changed significantly since the 1970s Credit:  Fox Photos Lead author Prof Susan Sawyer, said delays in young people leaving education, settling down and becoming parents, showed adolescence was now longer and argued that policies that support youth should be extended beyond teenage years. Countries such as New Zealand already treat children who have been in care as vulnerable until they are 25, allowing them the same rights as youngsters “Age definitions are always arbitrary,” she said, but “our current definition of adolescence is overly restricted.” “The ages of 10-24 years are a better fit with the development of adolescents nowadays.” However other academics argued that just because young people were unmarried or still in education did not mean they were not fully functioning adults. But Dr Jan Macvarish, a parenting sociologist at the University of Kent, told the BBC: “There is nothing inevitably infantilising about spending your early 20s in higher education or experimenting in the world of work. “Society should maintain the highest possible expectations of the next generation.” Prof Sawyer also admits there could be downsides to he plan, particularly if youngsters were no longer seen as responsible or capable of full engagement in society until they were 24. "Such a view would risk disenfranchising adolescents and undermines their rights to fully participate in society," she added.

From: www.yahoo.com

CancerSEEK to detect the disease with a new blood test

Added: 20.01.2018 7:59 | 0 views | 0 comments

Scientists in the US have developed a universal blood test capable of detecting eight different types of cancer.

From: www.aljazeera.com

Scientists develop blood test that can screen for eight common forms of cancer

Added: 20.01.2018 3:40 | 0 views | 0 comments

Eight common types of cancer could be picked up in a single blood test newly developed by scientists.

From: www.standard.co.uk

Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structures

Added: 19.01.2018 23:29 | 0 views | 0 comments

Researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to form optically active superlattices. The structures could be programmed to exhibit almost any color across the visible spectrum.

From: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Black hole research could aid understanding of how small galaxies evolve

Added: 19.01.2018 23:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

Scientists have solved a cosmic mystery by finding evidence that supermassive black holes prevent stars forming in some smaller galaxies.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

Engineers grow functioning human muscle from skin cells

Added: 19.01.2018 23:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

Engineers have grown the first functioning human muscle from non-muscle cells -- skin cells reverted to their primordial stem cell state. The ability to start from cellular scratch using non-muscle tissue will allow scientists to grow far more muscle cells, provide an easier path to genome editing and cellular therapies, and develop individually tailored models of rare muscle diseases for drug discovery and basic biology studies.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

How good bacteria control your genes

Added: 19.01.2018 23:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

Scientists have discovered a way that bacteria in the gut can control genes in our cells. Their work shows that chemical messages from bacteria can alter chemical markers throughout the human genome. The signal chemicals are made when bacteria digest fruits and vegetables. By communicating in this way, the bacteria may help to fight infections and to prevent cancer.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

Sun, wind, and power trading

Added: 19.01.2018 23:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

The use of renewables like the sun and wind can cause fluctuations in power grids. But what impact do these fluctuations have on security of supply? To answer this question, scientists analyzed different types of fluctuations in several power grids in Europe, Japan, and the USA -- and came to surprising conclusions.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

Caffeine’s sport performance advantage for infrequent tea and coffee drinkers

Added: 19.01.2018 23:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

Sports scientists have found that the performance enhancing benefits of caffeine are more apparent in athletes who do not drink caffeine-rich drinks such as tea, coffee, and energy drinks on a daily basis.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

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