News with tag SPA  RSS
Texas governor accepts recommendation, spares inmate

Added: 23.02.2018 19:14 | 0 views | 0 comments


HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday spared the life of a convicted killer shortly before the man's scheduled execution for masterminding the fatal shootings of his mother and brother.

From: www.yahoo.com

SpaceX boat tries to catch pricey rocket nosecone in the Pacific Ocean, but misses

Added: 23.02.2018 19:04 | 0 views | 0 comments


After SpaceX successfully blasted three satellites into space early Thursday morning, the company tried to catch the Falcon 9 rocket's expensive nosecone, also known as a fairing, on a ship in the Pacific Ocean. The vessel, named "Mr. Steven," was outfitted with a giant net. According to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, the boat missed catching the fairing by "a few hundred meters," but he thinks there's a simple fix: Bigger parachutes to better control the parachuting fairing. Missed by a few hundred meters, but fairing landed intact in water. Should be able catch it with slightly bigger chutes to slow down descent. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 22, 2018 The fairing, which sheltered and released the payload during the rocket launch, parachuted down to the Pacific Ocean. A GPS guidance system helped guide the parachute close to the long, outstretched metallic arms of the awaiting ship. Assuming the nosecone is in good shape, SpaceX may still try and retrieve it from the water.  Falcon fairing half as seen from our catcher’s mitt in boat form, Mr. Steven. No apparent damage from reentry and splashdown. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on Feb 22, 2018 at 7:36am PST Recovery of the rocket fairing is aimed at bringing down the cost of access to space, since this particular part of the rocket costs between $5 and $6 million dollars.  SpaceX famously lands its rocket boosters back on Earth and reuses them in subsequent launches, but it never before attempted to catch a rocket's fairing. SpaceX plans to outcompete its rocket rivals by reusing most of its rockets, as opposing to building new components for each launch.  SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's 'Starman' Tesla Roadster isn't your typical piece of space junk This launch, for example, featured a Falcon 9 rocket booster that had previously been to space in August 2017. SpaceX decided not to recover the rocket for a potential third launch, however.   Going to try to catch the giant fairing (nosecone) of Falcon 9 as it falls back from space at about eight times the speed of sound. It has onboard thrusters and a guidance system to bring it through the atmosphere intact, then releases a parafoil and our ship, named Mr. Steven, with basically a giant catcher’s mitt welded on, tries to catch it. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on Feb 22, 2018 at 6:07am PST Instead, the rocket fell back to Earth and crashed into the Pacific Ocean. According to SpaceX firmware engineer Tom Praderio, "SpaceX is making room for its next iteration of Falcon 9 rockets," so it had no reason to land and reuse the rocket for a third launch.  A screenshot of the Falcon 9 rocket second stage heading towards low-Earth orbit. The curvature of the Earth can be seen in the background.Image: spacexThe Falcon 9 rockets have proven to be quite reliable, as SpaceX launched them into space 18 times last year, with no failures. The company plans to surpass these launch numbers this year.  Besides the primary payload — a Spanish satellite that can capture extremely high-resolution images of Earth — SpaceX launched two of its own microsatellites. These satellites are a test, but likely the first of thousands of internet-beaming satellites called Starlink, which is intended to provide high-speed internet access to the web-deprived corners of the world, sometime in the early to mid 2020s. Today’s Falcon launch carries 2 SpaceX test satellites for global broadband. If successful, Starlink constellation will serve least served. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 21, 2018 The Federal Communications Commission has yet to approve the SpaceX Starlink constellation, but last week FCC chairmen Ajit Pai urged commissioners to approve the bold space internet project.  The PAZ satellite successfully separating from the Falcon 9 rocket.Image: spacex WATCH: Neil DeGrasse Tyson explains what 'shoot for the moon' actually means

From: www.yahoo.com

Dad who survived son's murder plot that killed mom, brother wants his life spared

Added: 23.02.2018 18:54 | 0 views | 0 comments


Kent Whitaker said he forgave his son Bart Whitaker, who is on death row and scheduled to be executed this week.

Tags: Murder, SPA
From: www.yahoo.com

Lucky flight catches glimpse of SpaceX launch from the air

Added: 23.02.2018 18:39 | 0 views | 0 comments


Elon Musk's SpaceX launched another rocket on Thursday morning, successfully sending three satellites into space.  After the Falcon9 took off from Vandenberg Air Force Base northwest of Santa Barbara, a lucky flight from Hawaii to LAX got an up-close look at the rocket as it made its way towards space. SEE ALSO: SpaceX boat tries to catch pricey rocket nosecone in the Pacific Ocean, but misses Redditor tKMagus shared a video of the rocket from his window seat of the plane, which gave a unique perspective we can't see back on Earth.  In the comment section, tKMagus said the pilot was aware of the rocket and notified the cabin of its whereabouts.  Another Redditor popped into the comments to say they think they spotted the plane as they watched the Falcon9 launch, making the whole world feel really teeny.  Comment from discussion Simplycax's comment from discussion "I got to see SpaceX Falcon9 launch with the StarLink prototype from my flight into LAX. It was an awesome way to start my morning.". We're guessing that tKMagus was pretty happy with their choice of a window seat for the overnight flight, and they were probably also grateful they chose the left side of the airplane.  WATCH: This flying jet ski blows boring boats out of the water

From: www.yahoo.com

Improved Hubble yardstick gives fresh evidence for new physics in the universe

Added: 23.02.2018 18:25 | 0 views | 0 comments

Astronomers have used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to make the most precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe since it was first calculated nearly a century ago. Intriguingly, the results are forcing astronomers to consider that they may be seeing evidence of something unexpected at work in the universe.

Tags: SPA, NASA
From: www.sciencedaily.com

Weather warning: Britain in deep freeze with temperatures colder than NORTH POLE

Added: 23.02.2018 17:25 | 0 views | 0 comments


PARTS of Britain are about to turn colder than the North Pole sparking a fresh raft of Government warnings.

From: www.express.co.uk

Good times are coming, says Alonso after driving new McLaren

Added: 23.02.2018 17:24 | 0 views | 0 comments

Double world champion Fernando Alonso sounded an optimistic note after driving the first Renault-powered McLaren Formula One car in Spain on Friday.

From: feeds.reuters.com

SpaceX boat tries to catch pricey rocket nosecone in the Pacific Ocean, but misses

Added: 23.02.2018 17:09 | 0 views | 0 comments


After SpaceX successfully blasted three satellites into space early Thursday morning, the company tried to catch the Falcon 9 rocket's expensive nosecone, also known as a fairing, on a ship in the Pacific Ocean. The vessel, named "Mr. Steven," was outfitted with a giant net. According to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, the boat missed catching the fairing by "a few hundred meters," but he thinks there's a simple fix: Bigger parachutes to better control the parachuting fairing. Missed by a few hundred meters, but fairing landed intact in water. Should be able catch it with slightly bigger chutes to slow down descent. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 22, 2018 The fairing, which sheltered and released the payload during the rocket launch, parachuted down to the Pacific Ocean. A GPS guidance system helped guide the parachute close to the long, outstretched metallic arms of the awaiting ship. Assuming the nosecone is in good shape, SpaceX may still try and retrieve it from the water.  Falcon fairing half as seen from our catcher’s mitt in boat form, Mr. Steven. No apparent damage from reentry and splashdown. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on Feb 22, 2018 at 7:36am PST Recovery of the rocket fairing is aimed at bringing down the cost of access to space, since this particular part of the rocket costs between $5 and $6 million dollars.  SpaceX famously lands its rocket boosters back on Earth and reuses them in subsequent launches, but it never before attempted to catch a rocket's fairing. SpaceX plans to outcompete its rocket rivals by reusing most of its rockets, as opposing to building new components for each launch.  SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's 'Starman' Tesla Roadster isn't your typical piece of space junk This launch, for example, featured a Falcon 9 rocket booster that had previously been to space in August 2017. SpaceX decided not to recover the rocket for a potential third launch, however.   Going to try to catch the giant fairing (nosecone) of Falcon 9 as it falls back from space at about eight times the speed of sound. It has onboard thrusters and a guidance system to bring it through the atmosphere intact, then releases a parafoil and our ship, named Mr. Steven, with basically a giant catcher’s mitt welded on, tries to catch it. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on Feb 22, 2018 at 6:07am PST Instead, the rocket fell back to Earth and crashed into the Pacific Ocean. According to SpaceX firmware engineer Tom Praderio, "SpaceX is making room for its next iteration of Falcon 9 rockets," so it had no reason to land and reuse the rocket for a third launch.  A screenshot of the Falcon 9 rocket second stage heading towards low-Earth orbit. The curvature of the Earth can be seen in the background.Image: spacexThe Falcon 9 rockets have proven to be quite reliable, as SpaceX launched them into space 18 times last year, with no failures. The company plans to surpass these launch numbers this year.  Besides the primary payload — a Spanish satellite that can capture extremely high-resolution images of Earth — SpaceX launched two of its own microsatellites. These satellites are a test, but likely the first of thousands of internet-beaming satellites called Starlink, which is intended to provide high-speed internet access to the web-deprived corners of the world, sometime in the early to mid 2020s. Today’s Falcon launch carries 2 SpaceX test satellites for global broadband. If successful, Starlink constellation will serve least served. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 21, 2018 The Federal Communications Commission has yet to approve the SpaceX Starlink constellation, but last week FCC chairmen Ajit Pai urged commissioners to approve the bold space internet project.  The PAZ satellite successfully separating from the Falcon 9 rocket.Image: spacex WATCH: Neil DeGrasse Tyson explains what 'shoot for the moon' actually means

From: www.yahoo.com

Dad who survived son's murder plot that killed mom, brother wants his life spared

Added: 23.02.2018 17:04 | 0 views | 0 comments


Kent Whitaker said he forgave his son Bart Whitaker, who is on death row and scheduled to be executed this week.

Tags: Murder, SPA
From: www.yahoo.com

Twitter sets crackdown on automated 'bot' accounts

Added: 23.02.2018 17:00 | 0 views | 0 comments


Twitter announced Wednesday a crackdown on accounts powered by software "bots" which can artificially amplify a person or cause and which have been accused of manipulating the social network during the 2016 US election. The San Francisco messaging platform said the move was intended to rid the service of spam-spewing automated accounts, and not aimed at people using the service according to the rules. "These changes are an important step in ensuring we stay ahead of malicious activity targeting the crucial conversations taking place on Twitter -- including elections in the United States and around the world," Twitter developer policy lead Yoel Roth said in a blog post.

From: www.yahoo.com

Older articles »
advertising
Contact us