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Hotel Indigo The Hague – Palace Noordeinde takes brand into The Netherlands

Added: 23.02.2018 3:54 | 0 views | 0 comments

IHG has opened its first Hotel Indigo in The Netherlands, Hotel Indigo The Hague – Palace Noordeinde. The new 63-room boutique hotel is located in the centre of The Hague – a city with a history of prestige and power – and is just steps away from the Royal Palace, home of the Dutch royal family.

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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle anthrax scare treated as 'racist hate crime' after letter with white powder sent to palace

Added: 22.02.2018 21:09 | 0 views | 0 comments


The Royal Family has been caught up in an anthrax scare after a racist poison pen letter containing white powder was allegedly posted to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. Police are investigating the suspect package, treating it as a "racist hate crime", after it was sent to St James’ Palace last week. The letter was opened by a member of staff and intercepted before it reached the Prince and Ms Markle, with specialist officers called in to investigate. Tests confirmed that the powder was harmless, with the couple informed about what had happened. The episode will likely leave members of the Royal Household deeply concerned about security ahead of the Royal wedding on May 19th, with the couple due to make several public appearances before then. Ms Markle is understood to already have specialist police protection, ahead of marrying into the Royal family. While she has previously been the subject of racist abuse online, this is the first known physical threat aimed at her and her fiance Prince Harry. The letter and powder were addressed to the couple at St James’ Palace, arriving on Monday, February 12. The couple live at Kensington Palace, and made a trouble-free public appearance in Edinburgh the next day. Police are now investigating whether there is any link between the incident and a package send to the Houses of Parliament the following day, reported to have been addressed to Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary. That parcel also contained powder found to be harmless. A spokesman for the Met confirmed police are investigating "after a package containing a substance was delivered to St James's Palace on Monday, 12 February". Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Credit: PA "The substance was tested and confirmed as non suspicious," he said. "Officers are also investigating an allegation of malicious communications which relates to the same package, and it is being treated as a racist hate crime. "Detectives are now investigating who sent the letter, and whether it is linked to white powder posted to the Palace of Westminster in the same week." No arrests have yet been made. A spokesman for Kensington Palace declined to comment. The Malicious Communications Act 1988 outlines the offence of sending letters with intent to “cause distress or anxiety”, which includes sending threats or messages which are “indecent or grossly offensive”. Such messages directed at Ms Markle will be of significant personal concern to the Prince, who has previously defended his partner against a “wave of abuse and harassment”. In November 2016, he issued an unusual statement detailing “racial undertones” in some sections of the press, and the “outright sexism and racism of social media trolls and web article comments”. “Prince Harry is worried about Ms. Markle’s safety and is deeply disappointed that he has not been able to protect her,” his communications secretary said then. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle: The story of their relationship, in pictures Security has been of paramount concern in the lead-up to the Windsor Castle wedding in May, where the couple are due to take a carriage ride through the streets to allow as many well-wishers as possible to see them. The Windsor destination is considered easier to police than the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s London wedding in 2011, which saw them travel between Westminster Abbey and Buckingham Palace. Then, it was said, the Met embarked on the “biggest security operation in a generation” with 5,000 police officers, snipers on rooftops and undercover officers mingling with crowds devoted to keeping the day running smoothly.

Billy Graham: US evangelist who preached to the Queen dies aged 99

Added: 22.02.2018 4:54 | 0 views | 0 comments


US evangelist Billy Graham, who counseled presidents and preached to millions across the world from his native North Carolina to communist North Korea during his 70 years in the pulpit, died on Wednesday at the age of 99, a spokesman said. He died at 8am EST (1pm GMT) at his home in Montreat, North Carolina, according to Jeremy Blume, a spokesman for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.  According to his ministry, he preached to more people than anyone else in history, reaching hundreds of millions of people either in person or via TV and satellite links. He was famed for his style of roaming the stage and hoisting a Bible as he declared Jesus Christ to be the only solution to humanity's problems. Mr Graham, nicknamed God's Machine Gun, became the de facto White House chaplain to several US presidents, most famously Richard Nixon. He also met with scores of world leaders and was the first noted evangelist to take his message behind the Iron Curtain. On Wednesday night the White House announced it would fly the US flag at half mast as a mark of respect for Graham and ordered other government buildings to follow suit.  The GREAT Billy Graham is dead. There was nobody like him! He will be missed by Christians and all religions. A very special man.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 21, 2018 He delivered a sermon to the queen in the Royal Family's private chapel, and was featured in the recent mini series "The Crown" as a spiritual adviser to the young Queen Elizabeth II.  At his 95th birthday celebrations in 2013 some 800 guests, including Republican politician Sarah Palin, business magnates Rupert Murdoch and Mr Trump and television hostess Kathie Lee Gifford paid tribute. Graham delivered a sermon for the queen on Easter Sunday in 1995 in the royal family’s private chapel The celebration featured a video of a sermon that his son Franklin said was Graham's last message to the nation. Graham had been working for a year on the video, which was aired on Fox News. In it, he said America was "in great need of a spiritual awakening." In his prime Graham had a thunderous, quick-burst speaking style that earned him the nickname "God's Machine Gun." Through his "Crusades for Christ," Graham sowed fields of devotion across the American heartland that would become fertile ground for the growth of the religious right's conservative political movement. His influence was fueled by an organization that carefully planned his religious campaigns, putting on international conferences and training seminars for evangelical leaders, Martin said. Graham was nicknamed God's Machine Gun Graham's mastery of the media was ground-breaking. In addition to radio and publishing, he used telephone lines, television and satellites to deliver his message to homes, churches and theaters around the world. Some 77 million saw him preach in person while nearly 215 million more watched his crusades on television or through satellite link-ups, a Graham spokeswoman said. News of Billy Graham's death is "fake news." He's more alive than ever! The life he now lives will never end. THAT was his message. If not true, his entire life was a tragedy. It wasn't. My tribute to Dr. Billy Graham attached. https://t.co/KJU3aoA4aC— Gov. Mike Huckabee (@GovMikeHuckabee) February 21, 2018 Billy Graham lifted eyes toward heaven and instilled heaven’s values in hearts. The world mourns this man of character, this man of God.— Mitt Romney (@MittRomney) February 21, 2018 Graham started meeting with presidents during the tenure of Harry Truman. He played golf with Gerald Ford, skinny-dipped in the White House pool with Lyndon Johnson, vacationed with George HW Bush and spent the night in the White House on Nixon's first day in office. George W Bush gave Graham credit for helping him rediscover his faith and in 2010, when it was difficult for Graham to travel, the then president Barack Obama made the trip to the preacher's log cabin home in North Carolina's Blue Ridge Mountains. puff: billy graham obit Graham's reputation took a hit because of Nixon after the release of 1972 White House tapes in which the two were heard making anti-Semitic comments. Graham later said he did not remember the conversation and apologised. Graham concluded his career of religious campaigns in June 2005 in New York with a three-day stand that attracted more than 230,000 people, his organisation said. He turned over his evangelical association to his son Franklin. Graham's other four children were also evangelists. In addition to suffering with Parkinson's disease for many years, Graham's health problems in his later years included a broken hip, a broken pelvis, prostate cancer and installation of a shunt in his brain to control excess fluid. He was hospitalised in 2011, 2012 and 2013 for respiratory problems.

Royal Family Death Brings Spiteful Burial Arrangements To Headlines After ‘Title-Snub’ Of Denmark Prince

Added: 20.02.2018 17:04 | 1 views | 0 comments


As a country mourns for a deceased Royal Family member, the headlines are indicating that this man has carried his resentment all the way to the grave. The death of Prince Henrik has left the country of Demark in mourning as the Danes line the streets to pay their respects three days ahead of the funeral.
Queen Margrethe was weeping over the coffin of her 83-year-old husband at the private service for the family, despite the rather shocking and public directions Prince Henrik left for his burial. It is well-known among the people of his country how Prince Henrik resented his title, putting him in a social standing not equal to his wife or his children and this resentment with him, as the Daily Mail reports today.

From: feeds.inquisitr.com

Queen Margrethe II Weeps During Prince Henrik's Funeral

Added: 20.02.2018 13:16 | 0 views | 0 comments

Mourners gathered at Christiansborg Palace Chapel on Tuesday for the funeral of Prince Henrik. Several officials and members of the Danish royal family attended the private ceremony to...

From: uk.eonline.com

Duchess of Cambridge gives a nod to Time's Up in royal green dress as Baftas stars turn out in black

Added: 19.02.2018 13:39 | 0 views | 0 comments


On one side, there were the industry’s biggest stars, turning the Bafta red carpet black in their visible support of the Time’s Up movement; on the other, the traditionalists insisting the Duchess of Cambridge could not be drawn into a global protest about sexual harassment and gender equality. On Sunday night, the Duchess attempted to walk the diplomatic line, eschewing an unofficial all-black dress code to see the cream of British cinema honoured at the Royal Albert Hall. Her choice of a dark green Jenny Packham dress with a black ribbon appeared to please and offend in equal measure, apparently designed to avoid the scandal of a future queen making an overt statement that could be perceived as political. The movement did not, however, go unnoticed; instead of sending a message through clothing, the Duke acknowledged it in writing. In a foreword in the ceremony’s programme, he mentioned steps taken to protect those in the industry, stating: “Levelling the playing field and ensuring a safe, professional working environment for aspiring actors, filmmakers and craft practitioners – regardless of their background and circumstances – is vital to ensure film remains accessible and exciting for all. Baftas 2018 | Main awards "As president, I am proud of the leadership Bafta have shown on this; in a year which rocked the industry as many brave people spoke up about bullying, harassment and abuse despite the risk to their professional careers and reputations.” The Duchess was one of a small number of women at this year’s ceremony not to wear all black, after a letter outlining the Time’s Up dress code was circulated. Neither the Duke, president of Bafta, nor the Duchess appeared to be wearing the Time’s Up lapel pin, which others wore on the red carpet. Amanda Berry, Catherine Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William Credit: James Gourley/BAFTA//REX/Shutterstock A spokesman for Kensington Palace did not comment on the choice. Catherine Quinn, the Duchess’s private secretary, attending the awards in her official capacity, chose to blend in discreetly in black. Members of the Royal family are supposed to avoid political statements, leaving the Duchess with a stark choice between being accused of overstepping her position or being the only woman wearing colour. Some critics were “disappointed”, arguing that objecting to sexual harassment was not political. From the start, there was little on anyone’s lips except the Time’s Up theme. Campaigners, wearing T-shirts and chanting about sisterhood, lay on the red carpet while stars gushed about the campaign’s aims in interviews. Clockwise from top left: Anya Taylor-Joy, Margot Robbie, the Duchess of Cambridge, Gemma Arterton and Joanna Lumley Credit: Mike Marsland/WireImage/AP/REX After the Duke and Duchess walked into the hall to polite applause to take their front row seats, Jane Lush, Bafta chairman, opened proceedings with a summary of the “revelation after revelation” leading up to the protest, telling the audience: “This is a moment in history. It should be a watershed.” Joanna Lumley, the first woman to host the awards solo in more than 20 years, acknowledged the “powerful protest” in her introduction. The first award, for outstanding British film, was presented by Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence to Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Graham Broadbent, its producer, delivered a speech referencing the “tectonic shift” in the industry, and the “meaningful change that can happen quickly”. Sam Rockwell, best supporting actor for the same film, admitted he “stands on the shoulders of strong, intelligent, righteous women who have made my life complete”. Despite the enthusiastic words, gender equality did not appear to bear out in the awards themselves: 39 statues were taken away by men and eight by women. Packing a punch: Florence Pugh on the red carpet Credit: Dave Benett/Getty Images Allison Janney, picking up the prize for best supporting actress for I, Tonya, avoided all things serious, using her speech to clear up a falsehood that she had graduated from Rada, when she in fact attended a two-week summer programme. Other winners included Darkest Hour, which saw Gary Oldman transformed into Winston Churchill with amazing prosthetics, won the award for best make-up and hair. Daniel Kaluuya, the British actor, won the public vote as Bafta’s rising star. The Shape of Water won prizes for original music and production design, Call Me By Your Name won best adapted screenplay, and Phantom Thread best costumes. Angelina Jolie wore a black gown to the event Credit: Mike Marsland/WireImage Women at Bafta made no secret of their aims for the evening. Kristin Scott Thomas, nominated for her Clementine Churchill in Darkest Hour, said of Time’s Up: “We need equality now – I think their slogan is absolutely right… Now it’s a question of moving it from conversation to action.” Andrea Riseborough, who walked the red carpet with activist Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, said those backing the movement hoped to get across “the idea that when all of this stops we all remember that this is an important cause and that we should carry on the conversation”.  Baftas 2018: the stars in pictures She added: “I’m here tonight to stand in solidarity with every woman, every person in the world who has suffered sexual abuse in the workplace.” Gemma Arterton arrived with Eileen Pullen and Gwen Davis, two of the “Dagenham Girls” who walked out of the Ford Motor Company’s Dagenham plant in June 1968 and finally won equal pay. Arterton, who starred in a stage musical version of their story, said: “I thought it was really fitting and I’m really happy and proud that I’m with Gwen and Eileen because they represent a normal person speaking up for what is actually right.” Bafta 2018 | Key films, reviewed   Salma Hayek, presenting the best actor award, said: “In this very important and historic year for women, I’m here to celebrate men.” She joked the award would go to Frances McDormand, one of the best actress nominees, before announcing the true winner: Gary Oldman. Oldman honoured the late prime minister, who held the line for “honour, integrity and freedom for his nation and the world”. McDormand, who did win best actress, accepted the award in a red, pink and black dress. She joked she had a problem with conformity but added: “I stand in full solidarity with my sisters in black.”

Duchess of Cambridge gives a nod to Time's Up in royal green dress as Baftas stars turn out in black

Added: 19.02.2018 8:54 | 0 views | 0 comments


On one side, there were the industry’s biggest stars, turning the Bafta red carpet black in their visible support of the Time’s Up movement; on the other, the traditionalists insisting the Duchess of Cambridge could not be drawn into a global protest about sexual harassment and gender equality. On Sunday night, the Duchess attempted to walk the diplomatic line, eschewing an unofficial all-black dress code to see the cream of British cinema honoured at the Royal Albert Hall. Her choice of a dark green Jenny Packham dress with a black ribbon appeared to please and offend in equal measure, apparently designed to avoid the scandal of a future queen making an overt statement that could be perceived as political. The movement did not, however, go unnoticed; instead of sending a message through clothing, the Duke acknowledged it in writing. In a foreword in the ceremony’s programme, he mentioned steps taken to protect those in the industry, stating: “Levelling the playing field and ensuring a safe, professional working environment for aspiring actors, filmmakers and craft practitioners – regardless of their background and circumstances – is vital to ensure film remains accessible and exciting for all. Baftas 2018 | Main awards "As president, I am proud of the leadership Bafta have shown on this; in a year which rocked the industry as many brave people spoke up about bullying, harassment and abuse despite the risk to their professional careers and reputations.” The Duchess was one of a small number of women at this year’s ceremony not to wear all black, after a letter outlining the Time’s Up dress code was circulated. Neither the Duke, president of Bafta, nor the Duchess appeared to be wearing the Time’s Up lapel pin, which others wore on the red carpet. Amanda Berry, Catherine Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William Credit: James Gourley/BAFTA//REX/Shutterstock A spokesman for Kensington Palace did not comment on the choice. Catherine Quinn, the Duchess’s private secretary, attending the awards in her official capacity, chose to blend in discreetly in black. Members of the Royal family are supposed to avoid political statements, leaving the Duchess with a stark choice between being accused of overstepping her position or being the only woman wearing colour. Some critics were “disappointed”, arguing that objecting to sexual harassment was not political. From the start, there was little on anyone’s lips except the Time’s Up theme. Campaigners, wearing T-shirts and chanting about sisterhood, lay on the red carpet while stars gushed about the campaign’s aims in interviews. Clockwise from top left: Anya Taylor-Joy, Margot Robbie, the Duchess of Cambridge, Gemma Arterton and Joanna Lumley Credit: Mike Marsland/WireImage/AP/REX After the Duke and Duchess walked into the hall to polite applause to take their front row seats, Jane Lush, Bafta chairman, opened proceedings with a summary of the “revelation after revelation” leading up to the protest, telling the audience: “This is a moment in history. It should be a watershed.” Joanna Lumley, the first woman to host the awards solo in more than 20 years, acknowledged the “powerful protest” in her introduction. The first award, for outstanding British film, was presented by Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence to Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Graham Broadbent, its producer, delivered a speech referencing the “tectonic shift” in the industry, and the “meaningful change that can happen quickly”. Sam Rockwell, best supporting actor for the same film, admitted he “stands on the shoulders of strong, intelligent, righteous women who have made my life complete”. Despite the enthusiastic words, gender equality did not appear to bear out in the awards themselves: 39 statues were taken away by men and eight by women. Packing a punch: Florence Pugh on the red carpet Credit: Dave Benett/Getty Images Allison Janney, picking up the prize for best supporting actress for I, Tonya, avoided all things serious, using her speech to clear up a falsehood that she had graduated from Rada, when she in fact attended a two-week summer programme. Other winners included Darkest Hour, which saw Gary Oldman transformed into Winston Churchill with amazing prosthetics, won the award for best make-up and hair. Daniel Kaluuya, the British actor, won the public vote as Bafta’s rising star. The Shape of Water won prizes for original music and production design, Call Me By Your Name won best adapted screenplay, and Phantom Thread best costumes. Angelina Jolie wore a black gown to the event Credit: Mike Marsland/WireImage Women at Bafta made no secret of their aims for the evening. Kristin Scott Thomas, nominated for her Clementine Churchill in Darkest Hour, said of Time’s Up: “We need equality now – I think their slogan is absolutely right… Now it’s a question of moving it from conversation to action.” Andrea Riseborough, who walked the red carpet with activist Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, said those backing the movement hoped to get across “the idea that when all of this stops we all remember that this is an important cause and that we should carry on the conversation”.  Baftas 2018: the stars in pictures She added: “I’m here tonight to stand in solidarity with every woman, every person in the world who has suffered sexual abuse in the workplace.” Gemma Arterton arrived with Eileen Pullen and Gwen Davis, two of the “Dagenham Girls” who walked out of the Ford Motor Company’s Dagenham plant in June 1968 and finally won equal pay. Arterton, who starred in a stage musical version of their story, said: “I thought it was really fitting and I’m really happy and proud that I’m with Gwen and Eileen because they represent a normal person speaking up for what is actually right.” Bafta 2018 | Key films, reviewed   Salma Hayek, presenting the best actor award, said: “In this very important and historic year for women, I’m here to celebrate men.” She joked the award would go to Frances McDormand, one of the best actress nominees, before announcing the true winner: Gary Oldman. Oldman honoured the late prime minister, who held the line for “honour, integrity and freedom for his nation and the world”. McDormand, who did win best actress, accepted the award in a red, pink and black dress. She joked she had a problem with conformity but added: “I stand in full solidarity with my sisters in black.”

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