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This idyllic Swiss village wants to pay you more than £50,000 to move there

Added: 21.11.2017 20:22 | 0 views | 0 comments


If it’s ever been a distant dream of yours to wind up in a tiny and beautiful mountain village, consider this. The Swiss town of Albinen, located in the scenic canton of Valais, wants to pay people 25,000 Swiss francs (£18,900) each to move there. The council will soon be voting on the new initiative, which aims to repopulate a community that has dwindled to just 240 residents, reports The Local. Under the scheme, each new adult resident will be paid the fee, with an additional 10,000 Swiss francs (£7,600) per child. For a family of four, that’s more than £53,000. Most of the previous residents who have left the village have been families with children, according to Swiss news agency ATS, with the last three departures leading to the closure of Albinen’s school. It should be noted, however, that this was never exactly a thriving neighbourhood. Its highest ever number of inhabitants on record was 380, back in 1900. What’s the catch? There are certain conditions attached to the proposed offer. New residents must be under the age of 45, and are required to build or purchase a property to live in full time, not used as a holiday home, worth at least 200,000 Swiss francs (£151,900). You’ll also have to remain in residence there for at least 10 years, or forfeit the fee. Officials hope that Albinen’s flailing economy will benefit from an influx of new homeowners through taxes, building contracts and the purchase of local produce. Switzerland has a high level of immigration from EU countries What does Albinen have to offer? Six square miles of Alpine land makes up the municipality of Albinen, huddled at an altitude of 4,300 ft in the south-west of Switzerland and dwarfed by its surrounding mountains.   Most of Albinen is farmland and forest, with its settled area of buildings and roads accounting for little over three per cent of it. Only 240 residents live here, surrounded by forest and farmland Credit: Wikipedia Commons Xenos There's little going on in the town's centre, save for its narrow cobbled turns, centuries-old houses, a church and a shop. And you’ll need to learn German, the region’s first language.  But hop in the car and it's less than four miles to Leukerbad, home to one of Europe's largest medical wellness, beauty and thermal baths complex. Charlie Chaplin, Tolstoy and Goethe were among those who travelled to the village to bathe in the calcium- and sulphate-rich thermal waters.  Switzerland tours Prefer to live in Italy? This is far from the first time a shrinking town in Europe has offered to pay people to move there, most commonly in Italy. Just last month, the Italian town of Candela in Puglia announced it would hand out up to €2,000 (£1,792) for new residents. They must live permanently in the village, rent a house, and have a salary of at least €7,500 (£6,723). Earlier this year, Italy also said it was giving away 103 of its historic buildings for free, with one catch - all takers will need to commit to transforming the properties into tourist facilities including hotels, restaurants or spas.

Footage shows African migrants being sold as slaves at auction for as little as £300 each

Added: 21.11.2017 20:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


The Libyan government is to investigate allegations that African migrants are being sold as slaves at auctions. Tens of thousands of migrants, many of them from West Africa but also Bangladesh, Somalia, Sudan and Eritrea, are being held in camps and warehouses on the Libyan coast, hoping to reach Europe. When the warehouses become overcrowded, or if migrants are unable to pay traffickers for the boat journey towards Italy – where many are rescued by NGO-operated vessels – they are sold. The existence of modern-day slave markets has been known for months, with testimony from the International Organisation for Migration and other humanitarian agencies, but last week CNN obtained video footage of one such auction.  In scenes reminiscent of the 19th century, when the slave trade was rife, auctioneers advertised a group of West African migrants as “big strong boys for farm work.” The auctioneers referred to the migrants in Arabic as “merchandise”. The CNN footage showed buyers bidding for the migrants, who were sold off for as little as $400 each. One West African man told the television network: “Sure, I was sold”.  Others recounted how they were beaten by their “owners” as they put to work. Ahmed Metig, the deputy prime minister of the UN-backed Government of National Accord in Tripoli, said the allegations would be investigated. He said he would establish a "commission to investigate these reports in order to apprehend and bring those responsible to justice.” Migrants sit in a detention centre run by the interior ministry of Libya's eastern-based government, in Benghazi Credit: Reuters Alpha Conde, the president of Guinea and chairman of the African Union, where many migrants come from, called for an inquiry and prosecutions relating to what he termed a "despicable trade... from another era". The Senegalese government called the apparent slave market a "blight on the conscience of humanity". The IOM reported the existence of slave markets in April. “The reports of ‘slave markets’ for migrants can be added to a long list of outrages [in Libya],” said Mohammed Abdiker, IOM’s head of operation and emergencies.  “The situation is dire. The more IOM engages inside Libya, the more we learn that it is a vale of tears for all too many migrants.” Migrants who are rescued at sea and brought to Italy have told how they are beaten, tortured and in some cases raped by traffickers in Libya.  Many young women end up as prostitutes on the streets of Italy, with Nigerian girls as young as 13 forced to sell themselves for as little as 10 euros (£8.90) a time, terrified into submission by gang rape and voodoo curses. It is estimated that 80 per cent of Nigerian teenage girls and young women who make it to Italy are forced into the sex trade.

Report of 'extremely high' radioactive pollution suggests nuclear cloud came from Russia

Added: 21.11.2017 20:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Russia's meteorological service has reported “extremely high pollution” of a radioactive isotope in the Urals near a facility that previously suffered the third worst nuclear catastrophe in history. The news bolsters international reports that a ruthenium-106 leak originating in the Urals sent a radioactive cloud over Europe.  Greenpeace Russia has said it will ask the prosecutor general to investigate the possible cover-up of a nuclear accident. Rosatom, Russia's state nuclear company, said in a statement to The Telegraph on Tuesday there had been "no unreported accidents" and the ruthenium-106 emission was "not linked to any Rosatom site". Its Mayak facility, where an explosion in 1957 contaminated a swath of central Russia, told state news agency RIA Novosti that it had not processed nuclear fuel with ruthenium-106 this year.  The isotope, which doesn't occur naturally, was detected in Germany, Austria, Italy and Switzerland in late September. France's nuclear safety institute said the “major” radiation leak likely occurred between the Urals and the Volga river.  Graphic: Path of the cloud Rosatom said in October the “account of a supposed Russian origin of the pollution is baseless”. But a report by the Rosgidromet service on Monday revealed that the concentration of ruthenium-106 in Argayash, a village near Mayak, exceeded natural background pollution by 986 times at the end of September. The head of the service said excessive ruthenium-106 levels had also been documented in Poland, Bulgaria and Ukraine. Responding to accusations that local authorities had covered up the leak, Yevgeny Savchenko, the Chelyabinsk region public safety minister, said on Monday “fluctuations in background radiation” had not reached dangerous levels and thus “there was no basis for protective measures”.  He also claimed it was suspicious that the leak was reported in France, “where there is a nuclear waste processing facility that competes with our Mayak”. The independent news outlet Znak quoted a source at Mayak as saying the ruthenium-106 could have come from nuclear waste brought there for reprocessing.  Vladimir Putin holds a meeting on the development of the electric power industry in November with representatives of Rosatom and other state companies. Credit: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images  

Buffon thanks Rakitic for World Cup offer

Added: 21.11.2017 18:46 | 0 views | 0 comments

TURIN, Italy (AP) Italy and Juventus goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon has thanked Ivan Rakitic for offering to give him his spot at the World Cup, but quipped it ''might not be a great idea.''

Tags: Italy, Goa
From: www.foxsports.com

This idyllic Swiss village wants to pay you more than £50,000 to move there

Added: 21.11.2017 17:27 | 0 views | 0 comments


If it’s ever been a distant dream of yours to wind up in a tiny and beautiful mountain village, consider this. The Swiss town of Albinen, located in the scenic canton of Valais, wants to pay people 25,000 Swiss francs (£18,900) each to move there. The council will soon be voting on the new initiative, which aims to repopulate a community that has dwindled to just 240 residents, reports The Local. Under the scheme, each new adult resident will be paid the fee, with an additional 10,000 Swiss francs (£7,600) per child. For a family of four, that’s more than £53,000. Most of the previous residents who have left the village have been families with children, according to Swiss news agency ATS, with the last three departures leading to the closure of Albinen’s school. It should be noted, however, that this was never exactly a thriving neighbourhood. Its highest ever number of inhabitants on record was 380, back in 1900. What’s the catch? There are certain conditions attached to the proposed offer. New residents must be under the age of 45, and are required to build or purchase a property to live in full time, not used as a holiday home, worth at least 200,000 Swiss francs (£151,900). You’ll also have to remain in residence there for at least 10 years, or forfeit the fee. Officials hope that Albinen’s flailing economy will benefit from an influx of new homeowners through taxes, building contracts and the purchase of local produce. Switzerland has a high level of immigration from EU countries What does Albinen have to offer? Six square miles of Alpine land makes up the municipality of Albinen, huddled at an altitude of 4,300 ft in the south-west of Switzerland and dwarfed by its surrounding mountains.   Most of Albinen is farmland and forest, with its settled area of buildings and roads accounting for little over three per cent of it. Only 240 residents live here, surrounded by forest and farmland Credit: Wikipedia Commons Xenos There's little going on in the town's centre, save for its narrow cobbled turns, centuries-old houses, a church and a shop. And you’ll need to learn German, the region’s first language.  But hop in the car and it's less than four miles to Leukerbad, home to one of Europe's largest medical wellness, beauty and thermal baths complex. Charlie Chaplin, Tolstoy and Goethe were among those who travelled to the village to bathe in the calcium- and sulphate-rich thermal waters.  Switzerland tours Prefer to live in Italy? This is far from the first time a shrinking town in Europe has offered to pay people to move there, most commonly in Italy. Just last month, the Italian town of Candela in Puglia announced it would hand out up to €2,000 (£1,792) for new residents. They must live permanently in the village, rent a house, and have a salary of at least €7,500 (£6,723). Earlier this year, Italy also said it was giving away 103 of its historic buildings for free, with one catch - all takers will need to commit to transforming the properties into tourist facilities including hotels, restaurants or spas.

Footage shows African migrants being sold as slaves at auction for as little as £300 each

Added: 21.11.2017 17:26 | 0 views | 0 comments


The Libyan government is to investigate allegations that African migrants are being sold as slaves at auctions. Tens of thousands of migrants, many of them from West Africa but also Bangladesh, Somalia, Sudan and Eritrea, are being held in camps and warehouses on the Libyan coast, hoping to reach Europe. When the warehouses become overcrowded, or if migrants are unable to pay traffickers for the boat journey towards Italy – where many are rescued by NGO-operated vessels – they are sold. The existence of modern-day slave markets has been known for months, with testimony from the International Organisation for Migration and other humanitarian agencies, but last week CNN obtained video footage of one such auction.  In scenes reminiscent of the 19th century, when the slave trade was rife, auctioneers advertised a group of West African migrants as “big strong boys for farm work.” The auctioneers referred to the migrants in Arabic as “merchandise”. The CNN footage showed buyers bidding for the migrants, who were sold off for as little as $400 each. One West African man told the television network: “Sure, I was sold”.  Others recounted how they were beaten by their “owners” as they put to work. Ahmed Metig, the deputy prime minister of the UN-backed Government of National Accord in Tripoli, said the allegations would be investigated. He said he would establish a "commission to investigate these reports in order to apprehend and bring those responsible to justice.” Migrants sit in a detention centre run by the interior ministry of Libya's eastern-based government, in Benghazi Credit: Reuters Alpha Conde, the president of Guinea and chairman of the African Union, where many migrants come from, called for an inquiry and prosecutions relating to what he termed a "despicable trade... from another era". The Senegalese government called the apparent slave market a "blight on the conscience of humanity". The IOM reported the existence of slave markets in April. “The reports of ‘slave markets’ for migrants can be added to a long list of outrages [in Libya],” said Mohammed Abdiker, IOM’s head of operation and emergencies.  “The situation is dire. The more IOM engages inside Libya, the more we learn that it is a vale of tears for all too many migrants.” Migrants who are rescued at sea and brought to Italy have told how they are beaten, tortured and in some cases raped by traffickers in Libya.  Many young women end up as prostitutes on the streets of Italy, with Nigerian girls as young as 13 forced to sell themselves for as little as 10 euros (£8.90) a time, terrified into submission by gang rape and voodoo curses. It is estimated that 80 per cent of Nigerian teenage girls and young women who make it to Italy are forced into the sex trade.

Italy FURIOUS at ‘joke’ Brussels: Losing EMA by drawing STRAWS costs Milan £1.5BN

Added: 21.11.2017 17:26 | 1 views | 0 comments

ITALY is on collision course with the European Union after missing out on hosting a key agency when officials made their final decision by drawing straws.

Tags: Brussels, EU, Italy
From: feedproxy.google.com

This idyllic Swiss village wants to pay you more than £50,000 to move there

Added: 21.11.2017 15:52 | 0 views | 0 comments


If it’s ever been a distant dream of yours to wind up in a tiny and beautiful mountain village, consider this. The Swiss town of Albinen, located in the scenic canton of Valais, wants to pay people 25,000 Swiss francs (£18,900) each to move there. The council will soon be voting on the new initiative, which aims to repopulate a community that has dwindled to just 240 residents, reports The Local. Under the scheme, each new adult resident will be paid the fee, with an additional 10,000 Swiss francs (£7,600) per child. For a family of four, that’s more than £53,000. Most of the previous residents who have left the village have been families with children, according to Swiss news agency ATS, with the last three departures leading to the closure of Albinen’s school. It should be noted, however, that this was never exactly a thriving neighbourhood. Its highest ever number of inhabitants on record was 380, back in 1900. What’s the catch? There are certain conditions attached to the proposed offer. New residents must be under the age of 45, and are required to build or purchase a property to live in full time, not used as a holiday home, worth at least 200,000 Swiss francs (£151,900). You’ll also have to remain in residence there for at least 10 years, or forfeit the fee. Officials hope that Albinen’s flailing economy will benefit from an influx of new homeowners through taxes, building contracts and the purchase of local produce. Switzerland has a high level of immigration from EU countries What does Albinen have to offer? Six square miles of Alpine land makes up the municipality of Albinen, huddled at an altitude of 4,300 ft in the south-west of Switzerland and dwarfed by its surrounding mountains.   Most of Albinen is farmland and forest, with its settled area of buildings and roads accounting for little over three per cent of it. Only 240 residents live here, surrounded by forest and farmland Credit: Wikipedia Commons Xenos There's little going on in the town's centre, save for its narrow cobbled turns, centuries-old houses, a church and a shop. And you’ll need to learn German, the region’s first language.  But hop in the car and it's less than four miles to Leukerbad, home to one of Europe's largest medical wellness, beauty and thermal baths complex. Charlie Chaplin, Tolstoy and Goethe were among those who travelled to the village to bathe in the calcium- and sulphate-rich thermal waters.  Switzerland tours Prefer to live in Italy? This is far from the first time a shrinking town in Europe has offered to pay people to move there, most commonly in Italy. Just last month, the Italian town of Candela in Puglia announced it would hand out up to €2,000 (£1,792) for new residents. They must live permanently in the village, rent a house, and have a salary of at least €7,500 (£6,723). Earlier this year, Italy also said it was giving away 103 of its historic buildings for free, with one catch - all takers will need to commit to transforming the properties into tourist facilities including hotels, restaurants or spas.

Footage shows African migrants being sold as slaves at auction for as little as £300 each

Added: 21.11.2017 15:47 | 0 views | 0 comments


The Libyan government is to investigate allegations that African migrants are being sold as slaves at auctions. Tens of thousands of migrants, many of them from West Africa but also Bangladesh, Somalia, Sudan and Eritrea, are being held in camps and warehouses on the Libyan coast, hoping to reach Europe. When the warehouses become overcrowded, or if migrants are unable to pay traffickers for the boat journey towards Italy – where many are rescued by NGO-operated vessels – they are sold. The existence of modern-day slave markets has been known for months, with testimony from the International Organisation for Migration and other humanitarian agencies, but last week CNN obtained video footage of one such auction.  In scenes reminiscent of the 19th century, when the slave trade was rife, auctioneers advertised a group of West African migrants as “big strong boys for farm work.” The auctioneers referred to the migrants in Arabic as “merchandise”. The CNN footage showed buyers bidding for the migrants, who were sold off for as little as $400 each. One West African man told the television network: “Sure, I was sold”.  Others recounted how they were beaten by their “owners” as they put to work. Ahmed Metig, the deputy prime minister of the UN-backed Government of National Accord in Tripoli, said the allegations would be investigated. He said he would establish a "commission to investigate these reports in order to apprehend and bring those responsible to justice.” Migrants sit in a detention centre run by the interior ministry of Libya's eastern-based government, in Benghazi Credit: Reuters Alpha Conde, the president of Guinea and chairman of the African Union, where many migrants come from, called for an inquiry and prosecutions relating to what he termed a "despicable trade... from another era". The Senegalese government called the apparent slave market a "blight on the conscience of humanity". The IOM reported the existence of slave markets in April. “The reports of ‘slave markets’ for migrants can be added to a long list of outrages [in Libya],” said Mohammed Abdiker, IOM’s head of operation and emergencies.  “The situation is dire. The more IOM engages inside Libya, the more we learn that it is a vale of tears for all too many migrants.” Migrants who are rescued at sea and brought to Italy have told how they are beaten, tortured and in some cases raped by traffickers in Libya.  Many young women end up as prostitutes on the streets of Italy, with Nigerian girls as young as 13 forced to sell themselves for as little as 10 euros (£8.90) a time, terrified into submission by gang rape and voodoo curses. It is estimated that 80 per cent of Nigerian teenage girls and young women who make it to Italy are forced into the sex trade.

I wanted to cry with Buffon – Rakitic sympathy for Italy great

Added: 21.11.2017 15:23 | 0 views | 0 comments

Barcelona midfielder Ivan Rakitic paid a glowing tribute to Gianluigi Buffon ahead of Wednesday’s Champions League match against Juventus, stating the veteran goalkeeper’s heart-wrenching farewell from international football was tough to witness. Buffon returns to Europe’s top competition after Italy’s ignominious exit from the World Cup, with Sweden’s play-off triumph over the Azzurri denying the […]

From: www.soccernews.com

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