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This idyllic Swiss village wants to pay you more than £50,000 to move there

Added: 21.11.2017 20:22 | 0 views | 0 comments


If it’s ever been a distant dream of yours to wind up in a tiny and beautiful mountain village, consider this. The Swiss town of Albinen, located in the scenic canton of Valais, wants to pay people 25,000 Swiss francs (£18,900) each to move there. The council will soon be voting on the new initiative, which aims to repopulate a community that has dwindled to just 240 residents, reports The Local. Under the scheme, each new adult resident will be paid the fee, with an additional 10,000 Swiss francs (£7,600) per child. For a family of four, that’s more than £53,000. Most of the previous residents who have left the village have been families with children, according to Swiss news agency ATS, with the last three departures leading to the closure of Albinen’s school. It should be noted, however, that this was never exactly a thriving neighbourhood. Its highest ever number of inhabitants on record was 380, back in 1900. What’s the catch? There are certain conditions attached to the proposed offer. New residents must be under the age of 45, and are required to build or purchase a property to live in full time, not used as a holiday home, worth at least 200,000 Swiss francs (£151,900). You’ll also have to remain in residence there for at least 10 years, or forfeit the fee. Officials hope that Albinen’s flailing economy will benefit from an influx of new homeowners through taxes, building contracts and the purchase of local produce. Switzerland has a high level of immigration from EU countries What does Albinen have to offer? Six square miles of Alpine land makes up the municipality of Albinen, huddled at an altitude of 4,300 ft in the south-west of Switzerland and dwarfed by its surrounding mountains.   Most of Albinen is farmland and forest, with its settled area of buildings and roads accounting for little over three per cent of it. Only 240 residents live here, surrounded by forest and farmland Credit: Wikipedia Commons Xenos There's little going on in the town's centre, save for its narrow cobbled turns, centuries-old houses, a church and a shop. And you’ll need to learn German, the region’s first language.  But hop in the car and it's less than four miles to Leukerbad, home to one of Europe's largest medical wellness, beauty and thermal baths complex. Charlie Chaplin, Tolstoy and Goethe were among those who travelled to the village to bathe in the calcium- and sulphate-rich thermal waters.  Switzerland tours Prefer to live in Italy? This is far from the first time a shrinking town in Europe has offered to pay people to move there, most commonly in Italy. Just last month, the Italian town of Candela in Puglia announced it would hand out up to €2,000 (£1,792) for new residents. They must live permanently in the village, rent a house, and have a salary of at least €7,500 (£6,723). Earlier this year, Italy also said it was giving away 103 of its historic buildings for free, with one catch - all takers will need to commit to transforming the properties into tourist facilities including hotels, restaurants or spas.

Report of 'extremely high' radioactive pollution suggests nuclear cloud came from Russia

Added: 21.11.2017 20:13 | 0 views | 0 comments


Russia's meteorological service has reported “extremely high pollution” of a radioactive isotope in the Urals near a facility that previously suffered the third worst nuclear catastrophe in history. The news bolsters international reports that a ruthenium-106 leak originating in the Urals sent a radioactive cloud over Europe.  Greenpeace Russia has said it will ask the prosecutor general to investigate the possible cover-up of a nuclear accident. Rosatom, Russia's state nuclear company, said in a statement to The Telegraph on Tuesday there had been "no unreported accidents" and the ruthenium-106 emission was "not linked to any Rosatom site". Its Mayak facility, where an explosion in 1957 contaminated a swath of central Russia, told state news agency RIA Novosti that it had not processed nuclear fuel with ruthenium-106 this year.  The isotope, which doesn't occur naturally, was detected in Germany, Austria, Italy and Switzerland in late September. France's nuclear safety institute said the “major” radiation leak likely occurred between the Urals and the Volga river.  Graphic: Path of the cloud Rosatom said in October the “account of a supposed Russian origin of the pollution is baseless”. But a report by the Rosgidromet service on Monday revealed that the concentration of ruthenium-106 in Argayash, a village near Mayak, exceeded natural background pollution by 986 times at the end of September. The head of the service said excessive ruthenium-106 levels had also been documented in Poland, Bulgaria and Ukraine. Responding to accusations that local authorities had covered up the leak, Yevgeny Savchenko, the Chelyabinsk region public safety minister, said on Monday “fluctuations in background radiation” had not reached dangerous levels and thus “there was no basis for protective measures”.  He also claimed it was suspicious that the leak was reported in France, “where there is a nuclear waste processing facility that competes with our Mayak”. The independent news outlet Znak quoted a source at Mayak as saying the ruthenium-106 could have come from nuclear waste brought there for reprocessing.  Vladimir Putin holds a meeting on the development of the electric power industry in November with representatives of Rosatom and other state companies. Credit: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images  

Spurs proved doubters wrong by winning group - Kane

Added: 21.11.2017 18:26 | 0 views | 0 comments

Tottenham come from behind to beat Borussia Dortmund in Germany and secure first place in Group H of the Champions League.

From: www.bbc.co.uk

France’s Monstrous Char B1 Tank Ate Hitler's Best Tanks for Breakfast

Added: 21.11.2017 18:22 | 0 views | 0 comments


Once he had destroyed the entire company—11 Panzer IIIs and two Panzer IVs in all—Billotte continued his advance and added two 37-millimeter anti-tank guns to the tally. By 7:00 A.M., Stonne was back under French control and would remain so for the rest of the day. The same day, the tank Riquewhir would charge into a column of enemy infantry, its blood-stained tracks causing the German 64th Schutzen Regiment to panic and flee an entire sector of Stonne.

From: www.yahoo.com

Germany Has Plunged Into Unprecedented Political Chaos

Added: 21.11.2017 18:07 | 0 views | 0 comments


It’s going to be a while before Europe’s most powerful country has a stable government – and Angela Merkel probably won't be leading it.

From: www.yahoo.com

Missing Argentine submarine 'running out of air' and had reported fault before vanishing

Added: 21.11.2017 17:57 | 0 views | 0 comments


An Argentine submarine missing in the South Atlantic is likely to be running out of air and had reported technical problems before vanishing, naval officials have said.  ARA San Juan’s last message reported a short circuit in its batteries and the vessel was ordered to return to its home. The Argentine navy quashed hopes that incomplete satellite calls detected over the weekend could have been from the vessel, but then on Monday night said it was analysing separate "noise" to see if it was the boat. Enrique Balbi, a Navy spokesman, said two of  search vessels had detected the sound and called in a US P-8 Poseidon plane to record it with sonobuoys. He later said experts determined the noise did not come from tools being banged against the hull of a submarine as was previously reported by some media. He said it likely came from a "biological" source. ARA San Juan  in Buenos Aires. Credit: AFP Two oceanographic ships had been dispatched to the site of the sound to send down probes, the spokesman said, adding that the analysis of the captured sound would take some three hours. Buenos Aires had been beginning to face domestic criticism of its handling of the search, with one union describing government efforts as badly coordinated and apathetic. The submarine and its crew of 44 have now been missing for five days as a growing fleet of international vessels and patrol planes brave 20ft waves and high winds to search hundreds of square miles. Timeline | Submarine accidents US Navy submarine rescue chambers have been flown to the region in the hope of bringing the crew to the surface in case the vessel can be found. Gabriel Galeazzi, a spokesman for the Argentine Navy, said the German-built diesel electric vessel had surfaced on Wednesday to report the fault. He said: “At that moment the commander was ordered to go directly to Mar de Plata. After that we lost contact.” He suggested the fault could have affected the submarine’s navigation, but said it did have back-up systems. Search and rescue mission for Argentinian submarine Although the crew has enough food, oxygen and fuel to survive about 90 days on the sea's surface, they only have enough oxygen to last for seven days if submerged. After that, the boat  would have to surface or get near the surface to replenish air supply. Seven brief satellite signals lasting only seconds were detected over the weekend, raising hopes the crew were trying to call and prompting jubilation among the waiting families. But analysis of the low frequency signals later found they were not from the submarine. Up to 20 vessels, including the Royal Navy’s HMS Protector and HMS Clyde are joining the search. Britain has also sent an RAF C-130 aircraft and a Voyager refuelling aircraft to help it search for longer. Submarine rescue mission Cdr Erik Reynolds, spokesman for the US Navy, which is coordinating the international effort, said vessels were using their sonar to hunt for the ship, though high waves were hampering efforts. Maritime patrol planes are searching for signs of oil or waste that could have been jettisoned by the crew to signal their location. Two US Navy undersea submarine rescue vessels are on standby if needed. The vessels can attach to the hatch of a stricken submarine at depths of up to 2,000ft and then ferry surviving crew back to the surface. "There is no good news," Juan Carlos Mendoza, father of crew member Fernando Mendoza, told local reporters. "Hopefully they have oxygen." A ship leaves a Naval base to join the search for missing submarine ARA San Juan, in Mar del Plata, Argentina Credit: a Devo Source: The ARA San Juan was inaugurated in 1983, making it the newest of the three submarines in the navy's fleet. Built in Germany, it underwent maintenance in 2008 in Argentina. That maintenance included the replacement of its four diesel engines and its electric propeller engines, according to specialist publication Jane's Sentinel. ATEPSA, a union representing workers in the protection and security of aeronautics, said the case of the submarine "puts centre stage the recurring failures in state policies". It said in a statement that "the apathy in the Services of Search and Rescue, and the lack of coordination which exists in all the public bodies involved, are the faithful reflection of multiple errors which complicate the principle objective: to reach the victims in an urgent manner". Juan Carlos Mendoza, father of Fernando Mendoza, a crew member of the missing submarine ARA San Juan, stands outside the Naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina waiting for news Credit: AP The union noted workers in several airports were participating in search operations "despite the problems of communication in the oceanic sector due to lack of investment." This was "aggravated by the fact that the plant that transmits and receives all the aeronautic communications in the country does not have staff," it complained.

From: www.yahoo.com

This idyllic Swiss village wants to pay you more than £50,000 to move there

Added: 21.11.2017 17:27 | 0 views | 0 comments


If it’s ever been a distant dream of yours to wind up in a tiny and beautiful mountain village, consider this. The Swiss town of Albinen, located in the scenic canton of Valais, wants to pay people 25,000 Swiss francs (£18,900) each to move there. The council will soon be voting on the new initiative, which aims to repopulate a community that has dwindled to just 240 residents, reports The Local. Under the scheme, each new adult resident will be paid the fee, with an additional 10,000 Swiss francs (£7,600) per child. For a family of four, that’s more than £53,000. Most of the previous residents who have left the village have been families with children, according to Swiss news agency ATS, with the last three departures leading to the closure of Albinen’s school. It should be noted, however, that this was never exactly a thriving neighbourhood. Its highest ever number of inhabitants on record was 380, back in 1900. What’s the catch? There are certain conditions attached to the proposed offer. New residents must be under the age of 45, and are required to build or purchase a property to live in full time, not used as a holiday home, worth at least 200,000 Swiss francs (£151,900). You’ll also have to remain in residence there for at least 10 years, or forfeit the fee. Officials hope that Albinen’s flailing economy will benefit from an influx of new homeowners through taxes, building contracts and the purchase of local produce. Switzerland has a high level of immigration from EU countries What does Albinen have to offer? Six square miles of Alpine land makes up the municipality of Albinen, huddled at an altitude of 4,300 ft in the south-west of Switzerland and dwarfed by its surrounding mountains.   Most of Albinen is farmland and forest, with its settled area of buildings and roads accounting for little over three per cent of it. Only 240 residents live here, surrounded by forest and farmland Credit: Wikipedia Commons Xenos There's little going on in the town's centre, save for its narrow cobbled turns, centuries-old houses, a church and a shop. And you’ll need to learn German, the region’s first language.  But hop in the car and it's less than four miles to Leukerbad, home to one of Europe's largest medical wellness, beauty and thermal baths complex. Charlie Chaplin, Tolstoy and Goethe were among those who travelled to the village to bathe in the calcium- and sulphate-rich thermal waters.  Switzerland tours Prefer to live in Italy? This is far from the first time a shrinking town in Europe has offered to pay people to move there, most commonly in Italy. Just last month, the Italian town of Candela in Puglia announced it would hand out up to €2,000 (£1,792) for new residents. They must live permanently in the village, rent a house, and have a salary of at least €7,500 (£6,723). Earlier this year, Italy also said it was giving away 103 of its historic buildings for free, with one catch - all takers will need to commit to transforming the properties into tourist facilities including hotels, restaurants or spas.

Tottenham comeback at Dortmund clinches top spot

Added: 21.11.2017 17:08 | 0 views | 0 comments

Tottenham come from behind to beat Borussia Dortmund in Germany and secure first place in Group H of the Champions League.

From: www.bbc.co.uk

Climate changes triggered immigration to America in the 19th century, study finds

Added: 21.11.2017 16:43 | 0 views | 0 comments

From Trump to Heinz, some of America's most famous family names and brands trace their origins back to Germans who emigrated to the country in the 19th century. Researchers have now found that climate was a major factor in driving migration from Southwest Germany to North America during the 19th century.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

Climate changes triggered immigration to America in the 19th century, study finds

Added: 21.11.2017 16:38 | 0 views | 0 comments

From Trump to Heinz, some of America's most famous family names and brands trace their origins back to Germans who emigrated to the country in the 19th century. Researchers have now found that climate was a major factor in driving migration from Southwest Germany to North America during the 19th century.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

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