News with tag Genes  RSS
Acer Nitro 5 (AN515-51-70V4) 15.6″ Gaming Laptop, 7th Gen Core i7, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD + 1TB HDD - $948.00

Added: 14.12.2017 10:05 | 0 views | 0 comments

This Acer Nitro 5 (AN515-51-70V4) 15.6" Gaming Laptop features 7th Gen Core i7, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD + 1TB HDD. ...

Tags: Genes, Acer, SSD, HDD
From: www.dealepic.com

How a gene mutation could help to treat chronic pain

Added: 14.12.2017 10:00 | 0 views | 0 comments

Researchers suggest that a rare gene mutation that causes insensitivity to pain could be utilized to uncover new treatments for chronic pain.

Tags: Genes, Cher
From: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Groundbreaking gene therapy trial set to cure hemophilia

Added: 14.12.2017 9:23 | 0 views | 0 comments

A 'cure' for hemophilia is one step closer, following results of a groundbreaking gene therapy trial.

From: www.sciencedaily.com

If Roy Moore’s loss in Alabama shows us anything, it’s that we desperately need change

Added: 14.12.2017 9:00 | 0 views | 0 comments

That Senate race has revealed important racial and gender fault lines in this country. Maybe some day we’ll reach a level of equality and humanity that makes our current hard, political lines more permeable.

Tags: Genes, Alabama
From: www.seattletimes.com

Gene Editing with CRISPR-Cas9: The Next Step in Human Evolution to be Worth 25 Billion by 2030

Added: 14.12.2017 8:34 | 0 views | 0 comments

CRISPR-Cas9 tools have recently created a buzz in the global healthcare industry, with the development of numerous applications-focused solutions—and intensifying patenting disputes. The invention of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tools is one of the greatest scientific revolutions of this generation.

Tags: Genes
From: www.forbes.com

UAE delegate 'storms out' of UN human rights meeting

Added: 14.12.2017 5:16 | 0 views | 0 comments

Activists say officials refused to address accusations including torture at meeting with civil society groups in Geneva.

Tags: Genes, USA
From: www.aljazeera.com

Tasmanian tiger was 'doomed by poor DNA' long before it was wiped out by hunting, scientists say

Added: 14.12.2017 1:35 | 0 views | 0 comments


Scientists in Australia have mapped the genetic sequence of the extinct Tasmanian tiger, raising hopes of reviving the species, whose last survivor died in a zoo in the city of Hobart in September 1936. The landmark study of the Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was based on examination of DNA from a female pup that had been preserved in ethanol at a museum since 1909. Andrew Pask, a researcher from the University of Melbourne, said that establishing a blueprint of the thylacine’s entire genetic code was the first step in trying to bring back the species through cloning. “As this genome is one of the most complete for an extinct species, it is technically the first step to ‘bringing the thylacine back’,” he said.  “We are still a long way off that possibility. We would need to develop a marsupial model to host the thylacine genome, like work conducted to include mammoth genes in the modern elephant.” Tasmanian tigers became extinct on the Australian mainland about 3,000 years ago but survived on the island state of Tasmania. The species was hunted by European settlers who believed the animals threatened their sheep and who were encouraged by a government bounty of £1 per carcass. Tasmanian tigers or thylacines photographed at Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart in Australia's Tasmania state in 1918 Credit:  AFP / TASMANIAN MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY The last known creature died in captivity in 1936, though the species was not officially declared extinct until 1982. But the genome study revealed that the sandy-coloured marsupial may have become extinct even if humans had not settled in Tasmania. The sequencing found that the thylacine had little genetic diversity, making it harder for it to survive changes in environmental conditions. "They were actually in pretty bad genetic shape and it wasn't because of their isolation on Tasmania. It was a longer-term decline in their history," Dr Pask said. “We certainly made them go extinct — there's no question about that. But we now know even if [thylacines] were still around today they'd probably be in the same genetic dire circumstances as the Tasmanian devil [a local species that is under threat]." The Tasmanian tiger has a somewhat mythical status in Australia and there is still frenzied speculation about whether it may have survived in the wild. There have been regular reported sightings, though most experts believe that the creatures that are spotted are probably feral dogs and that the thylacine is unlikely to have survived. Recent unconfirmed sightings in the state of Queensland prompted a fresh search which has so far proven fruitless. The study found that the genetic health of the thylacine became compromised about 70,000 to 120,000 years ago, an era which coincided with an ice age. The Tasmanian species became  isolated when the island was cut off from the mainland due to rising seas about 14,000 years ago. On the mainland, the species became extinct due to extreme weather and drought, according to a study released earlier this year. Experts said it could take some years – and billions of dollars - to revive the species. "We still have a way to go to get the technology and to get that at a reasonable cost," Christy Hipsley, from Museums Victoria, told Channel Seven. However, Dr Pask said he believed humans have a moral obligation to try to revive the species. "I think we were responsible for hunting [the species] to extinction - in that case, we almost owe it to the species to bring it back," he said. The findings were published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Acer Aspire E 15 (E5-576G-5762) 15.6″ Laptop, 8th Gen Core i5, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD - $599.00

Added: 14.12.2017 1:09 | 1 views | 0 comments

This Acer Aspire E 15 (E5-576G-5762) 15.6" Laptop features 8th Gen Core i5, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD. ...

Tags: Genes, Acer, SSD
From: www.dealepic.com

Immune cells turn back time to achieve memory

Added: 14.12.2017 0:45 | 0 views | 0 comments

What distinguishes memory CD8 T cells from untrained naive cells is that they can respond rapidly, within minutes or hours. The new research illuminates how they do it -- their genes are poised to respond, even years after initial activation.

Tags: Genes
From: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Immune cells turn back time to achieve memory

Added: 14.12.2017 0:41 | 0 views | 0 comments

What distinguishes memory CD8 T cells from untrained naive cells is that they can respond rapidly, within minutes or hours. The new research illuminates how they do it -- their genes are poised to respond, even years after initial activation.

Tags: Genes
From: www.sciencedaily.com

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